8th Annual "My Arizona" Lecture

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Recorded video of the lecture: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzcC0QK87X0

Mark your calendar for the 8th Annual "My Arizona" Lecture on Friday, February 19, 2016, from 3:30pm-4:45pm.  Professor Thomas Sheridan will present "Moquis and Kastiilam: Hopis, Spaniards, and the Trauma of History" as part of the series, which is co-sponsored by the School of Geography and Development and the Southwest Center.  The lecture will take place at the ENR2 Building, Rm. S107 (directly west of the 6th St. parking garage on the south side of the University of Arizona campus) and will be followed by a reception.

Abstract:  This lecture compares and contrasts Spanish documents about the Hopis, whom they called "Moquis," with Hopi oral traditions about the Spaniards, whom they called "Kastiilam." It is drawn from the Hopi History Project, a collaboration between UA and the Hopi Tribe, particularly its Cultural Preservation Office.  It is framed and informed by the concept of historical trauma:  even though the Hopis were the only Pueblo group never re-conquered by the Spaniards after the 1680 Pueblo Revolt, the trauma of Franciscan missionary abuses, the killing of Franciscan missionaries, and, most tellingly, the destruction of the Hopi community of Awat'ovi by other Hopis in 1700 to prevent the missionaries from returning, continue to haunt Hopi life today.

Thomas E. Sheridan, Ph.D., is Research Anthropologist at the Southwest Center and Professor of Anthropology in the University of Arizona School of Anthropology. He has conducted ethnographic and ethnohistoric research in the Southwest and northern Mexico since 1971. He directed the Mexican Heritage Project at the Arizona Historical Society from 1982-1984, and was director of the Office of Ethnohistorical Research at the Arizona State Museum from 1997 to 2003. Since 1997, he’s been involved in land-use politics in Arizona and the Southwest. He served as chair of the Canoa Heritage Foundation, and has been heavily involved in Pima County’s visionary Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan since 1998, chairing the Ranch Conservation Technical Advisory Team. Selected publications include: Los Tucsonenses: The Mexican Community of Tucson, 1854-1941 (UA Press, 1986); Where the Dove Calls: The Political Ecology of a Peasant Corporate Community in Northwestern Mexico (UA Press, 1988); Arizona: A History (UA Press 1995; 2012 rev ed); Landscapes of Fraud: Mission Tumacacori, the Baca Float, and the Betrayal of the O’Odham (UA Press, 2006); Stitching the West Back Together: Conservation of Working Landscapes (University of Chicago Press, 2014); and Moquis and Kastiilam, Hopis, Spaniards, and the Trauma of History (UA Press, 2015).

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01/27/2016 - 11:44