2011 GIST Masters Project Abstracts

2011 Geographic Information Systems Technology Master’s Project Presentations

Please join us as the students from the 2011 MS-GIST program present their final Master's projects. 

The GIST Master’s Project, done in lieu of a Master’s Thesis, reflects original research as well as what a student has learned from the program. Students are required to formulate, design, implement, and present results related to (1) a substantive normative and/or scientific geographic problem, (2) the development of a GIS application, (3) a geovisualization problem or application.  Master’s Project can focus on subjects related to personal interests, work done through an employer or an internship, or work that is supervised by a faculty or staff member on campus. All projects are approved by the program director in advance and students submit a final project report and present their findings at this annual event in December.

Click here for PDF version of Schedule

December 6th, 2011

   

Start Time

End Time

Name

Title

6:10

 

6:30

 

Tanya Owens

 

Utilizing Web GIS and Published Geoprocessing Tools

 

6:30

 

6:50

 

Matthew Berube

 

 

Historic Preservation and GIS: Representing Historic Districts and Properties in a Single Focus Web Map  

6:50

7:10

Marion Constante

 

Geologic Modeling of a Gold Deposit Using GIS

 

7:10

7:25

Break

 

7:25

 

 

7:45

 

 

 

Erik Glenn

 

 

Suitable Locations for Planting Trees in Downtown Tucson: Using Shadow Analysis to Create a Useful Time-Enabled Web Tool

 

 

7:45

 

8:05

 

 

Jeffrey Little

 

 

Gateway Crime Analysis: Using Graffiti Locations to Uncover Crime Trends

 

8:05

 

 

 

8:25

 

 

 

Heston Smith

 

 

 

Mapping and spatial analysis using data collected with varying skill, accuracy, and knowledge of fundamental GIS principles

 

 

 

8:25

 

 

 

 

8:45

 

 

 

 

Kenneth Stockton

 

 

 

 

Range Size, Distribution, and Seasonal Activity Levels of Western Diamondback Rattlesnakes at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum

 

 

 

 

December 7th, 2011

   

Start Time

End Time

Name

Title

6:10

 

 

6:30

 

 

 

Lynn Jarzombek

 

 

Pima County, Arizona Government Property Rights: Web application to show property owned by Pima County and utilized by others

 

6:30

 

 

 

6:50

 

 

 

Lirain Urreiztieta

 

 

 

6:50

 

 

7:10

 

 

Robert Walker

 

 

 

Landcover Change Detection in Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

 

 

7:10

7:25

Break

 

 

7:25

 

 

 

 

7:45

 

 

 

 

Matt Breed

 

 

 

 

Social Interaction and Place Engagement: Evaluating Relationships Between Social Capital and Spatial Neighborhood Interaction within a Phoenix Neighborhood

 

7:45

 

8:05

 

Elsbeth Hoggatt

 

 

Little Havana:  Civic Engagement, Social Trust and Capital in a Hispanic Miami Neighborhood

8:05

 

 

 

8:25

 

 

 

Michael Robles

 

 

 

 

Comparing Social Capital and Activity Area: How Survey Respondents Interact with Their Landscape Based on Their Sense of Community

 

8:25

 

 

 

 

8:45

 

 

 

 

Caroline Patrick-Birdwell

 

 

 

Tactical Infrastructure:  Mapping the Environmental Impacts of the Border Wall in the Sky Island Bio-Region

 

 

December 12th, 2011

   

Start Time

End Time

Name

Title

6:10

 

 

 

               6:50

 

 

 

Rick Morris, Frederick Neasham, Melissa Talley

 

The Regional Economic Impact Simulator: a WebGIS tool for Publich Outreach, Academic Research, and Policy Analysis

 

6:50

7:05

Break

 

 

7:05

 

 

7:25

 

 

Benjamin Schaub

 

 

Designing Wildlife Corridors to Mitigate Human-Elephant Conflict in Africa

 

7:25 

 

 

7:45 

 

 

Matthew Stuart

 

 

 

Envisioning the Tangerine Road Corridor through a Land Use Model

 

 

7:45

 

 

8:05

 

 

Luke Moussa

 

 

 

Profiling Serial Crime: A Geographic Analysis of the Cleveland Torso Murders

 

 

 

 

 

December 13th, 2011

   

Start Time

End Time

Name

Title

6:10

 

 

6:30

 

 

Casey Boettcher

 

 

Mobile Applications for Mass Transit Using ESRI ArcGIS Server and the Android API

 

6:30

 

 

 

6:50

 

 

 

Jonathan Haller

 

 

 

Southwestern Willow Flycatcher Breeding Habitats: Building a Geoprocessing Tool for Online Distribution

 

 

6:50

 

 

 

 

7:10

 

 

 

 

Alana Hoye

 

 

 

 

Gap Analysis of the Eastern Shore of Virginia: Determining target areas for  restoration and acquisition for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

 

 

 

7:10

7:25

Break

 

 

7:25

 

 

7:45

 

 

David Olson

 

 

GIS and Mobile Application Design: Using Complex Queries to Determine the Availability of Food Delivery Services within the Tucson Area

7:45

 

 

8:05

 

 

Daniel Stauning

 

 

 

Using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) for Vegetation Mapping in the Rincon Mountain District (RMD) of Saguaro National Park

 

 

8:05

 

 

8:25

 

 

Dennis Kokosky

 

 

 

Mexico Immigrants in Two USA Neighborhoods: A look into Garfield in Phoenix Arizona and Pilsen in Chicago Illinois

 

 

     

 

December 14th, 2011

   

Start Time

End Time

Name

Title

6:10

 

6:30

 

Trevor Self

 

Living Beyond 100: Society, Change, and the New Longevity

 

6:30

 

 

6:50

 

 

Jennifer Psillas

 

 

Modeling Soil Erosion Potential on the Barry M. Goldwater Range – West

 

6:50

 

7:10

 

Amani Fayed

 

USA Drone Strikes: Spatial analysis of drone strikes and Suicide Bombers in Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Yemen

 

7:10

7:25

Break

 

 

7:25

 

 

 

 

7:45

 

 

 

 

Rita Sulkosky

 

 

 

Spatial Analysis of Mountain Lion Movement and Habitat Use near Prescott, Payson, and Tucson, Arizona

 

 

7:45

 

8:05

 

Dacey Zelman-Fahm

 

Incident Analysis and Fire Department Expansion in Tonopah, Arizona

8:05

 

 

8:25

 

 

Michael Lyons

 

 

 

Mapping Tucson’s Home Vacancy Rate

 

 

 

2011 Geographic Information Systems Technology

Master’s Project Presentations

ABSTRACTS

Title:                     Utilizing Web GIS and Published Geoprocessing Tools

Author:                Tanya Owens, tgowens@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:          Web Mapping, Geoprocessing Tools, Arcserver Manager, Arcgis Explorer, Model Builder

Abstract:              Now that geographic information system (GIS) web mapping is widely available in the forms of Google Maps, ArcServer Manager, and ArcGIS Explorer, this has created a more comfortable environment for many users. Companies generally have a limited number of staff in their GIS departments and therefore a backlog of work.  In an effort to alleviate excessive workloads and to add efficiency, geoprocessing tools and web maps can be created. These tools can then be used by other employees outside the GIS department to aid them in gathering the information they need for their projects. With just a small amount of training, a large number of employees will be able to familiarize themselves with the ArcServer and ArcGIS Explorer interfaces and utilize the geoprocessing tools created by the GIS department. To illustrate the possible uses of geoprocessing and web mapping tools, I have created an interactive web map showing archaeological site data as well as contour and land management along with published geoprocessing tools.  One of the primary tools will allow users to select a boundary that will identify the topographic contours that intersect that boundary. The tool then returns the statistics for those selected contours: maximum, minimum, and mean elevations within the selected boundary. These tools were created using ArcGIS model builder and published to the web for consumption. The geoprocessing tool allows the user to get the information they need without adding extra GIS department time to the project budget. 

Title:                     Historic Preservation and GIS: Representing Historic Districts and Properties in a Single Focus Web Map 

Author:                Matt Berube, berubem@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:          Historic Preservation, Zoning-Historic, Historic Properties, Built Environments, Archaeology Zones

Abstract:              The City of Tucson has 28 existing historic districts listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and 3 pending. The problem is most cities have few resources to track historic properties and make it available to the public through GIS. This map can be used as a model for other cities to follow. The new interface, built with ArcGIS Viewer for Flex, would be similar to other online mapping systems widely available, making the map easier and more intuitive for the user, which solves the problem of the current map not being user friendly. The map allows property owners access to digital documents that have previously been difficult to obtain; these include official documentation for historic districts and individual properties. The web map is constructed using data from the city vector geodatabase and includes a base map, legend, information pop-up boxes, and widgets. The result of the project is a common map that provides a lot of detail in a user friendly way. The map raises awareness of important properties and districts through pictures and links to forms. The benefits of having the data on the web map include users being able to identify what properties fall within historic districts, have historic designation, and which properties might qualify the owner for important local, State, and Federal tax incentives and funding programs. City staff will have a resource that identifies City-owned historic properties, important zoning areas, and digital access to official documentation through the click of a button.

Title:                     Geologic Modeling of a Gold Deposit Using GIS

Author:                Marion Constante, mconstante@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:          Gold, Geologic Model, Down Hole Survey, Assay, Mapinfo.

Abstract:              Geologic modeling of gold deposits from data gathered through exploration is necessary in determining if a deposit has the potential to be economic.  GIS aides in the exploration by creating the models using data extracted from a small diameter core of rock from the ore deposit by drilling exploratory holes within the project area.   The rock cores are assayed in a lab to extract the amount of gold within each sample.  The assay values along with the down hole survey data are compiled into tables to be used in a GIS.    The drill holes are recreated and cross-sections are then produced showing the location of the highest concentrations of gold in each sample, from here the ore deposit  can then be extracted and modeled in a three dimensional space. This project takes the data from 102 drill holes to demonstrate how a geologic model of a gold deposit is created using GIS software.  There are a number of different software packages used for the project including MapInfo and the Discover extension, which produced twenty-one cross-sections from the data.   Discover 3D and the geology and mine planning software Surpac is used to create the resulting geologic model.  The geologic model of the gold deposit will be used in the future for determining if the deposit is or could be a viable economic mining project.

Title:                     Suitable Locations for Planting Trees in Downtown Tucson: Using Shadow Analysis to Create a Useful Time-Enabled Web Tool

 

Author:                Erik Glenn, eglenn@email.arizona.edu

 

Keywords:          3D GIS, Web GIS, Volumetric Shadow Analysis, Shadow Maps, API For Flex

 

Abstract:              In downtown Tucson, Arizona, planners and landscape architects have much to consider when choosing suitable locations for planting trees and other landscape plants. In particular, the amount of sunlight received at various times of the year is a huge factor. Using data layers provided by the City of Tucson—including aerial imagery, LiDAR data and 3D building shapes—this project created time-enabled shadow maps for the downtown area that were then displayed interactively in a web interface. ESRI’s ArcScene product and 3D Analyst extension, along with the 3D buildings layer, a volumetric shadow analysis template and the PyEphem astronomical computation program, were used to generate shadow maps for different times of day and days of the year. In order to display these maps, an interactive web tool was created using ArcGIS API for Flex and its time slider component. Preliminary results of the shadow analysis indicate that there are numerous locations in downtown Tucson that receive sufficient shade in the summer and plenty of sunlight in winter months. In addition, it seems that a web tool designed for visualization of the percentage of time a location is in shadow throughout the year will prove extremely useful for municipal employees, business owners and other stakeholders.

 

Title:                     Gateway Crime Analysis: Using Graffiti Locations to Uncover Crime Trends

Author:                Jeffrey Little, jrlittle@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:          Graffiti, Crime Trends, Density Analysis, Regression, 2010 Census

Abstract:              A gateway crime is a type of crime that has little to no consequences but can lead to other, more serious crimes in the future. By themselves or in conjunction with demographic trends, gateway crimes have the capability of uncovering and predicting other, more serious crime trends. This paper examines the gateway crime that is easiest to track: graffiti. The location specific, semi-permanent nature of this crime type lends itself to density analysis and comparison with other crime data. The data used in this analysis includes graffiti locations cleaned by the City of Tucson and dispatch reports from the Tucson Police Department spanning from January of 2009 to June of 2011. Utilizing spatial statistics and geographic information systems (GIS) tools, the paper assesses the spatial and temporal relationship between graffiti incidents and crime locations over the aforementioned time period. The overall results show that there is a spatial relationship between graffiti and other types of crime but more accurate trend predictions require additional geographic or demographic variables.

Title:                     Mapping and spatial analysis using data collected with varying skill, accuracy, and knowledge of fundamental GIS principles

Author:                Heston Smith, hestonsmith@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:          GIS, Tucson, Cartography, Citizen Scientist, Crowdsourcing

Abstract:              GIS integrates data from different sources for use in spatial analysis and mapping.  The ability to integrate data from sources using different collection methods, varying scales, accuracy, and skill  presents challenges.  The 2011 BioBlitz, a joint venture between Saguaro National Park and National Geographic, presented the opportunity to work with a dataset that was created by a group made up of researchers, citizen scientist, high school and grade school students.  The integration of data of varying quality is a common situation in GIS analysis but the data is not normally collected in a situation as controlled as a BioBlitz event.  All data collectors were provided with a standard form that allowed all data to be integrated into a Microsoft Access database.  The coordinates were recorded by many methods: coordinates from gps units of varying accuracy, drawn on maps, derived from a UTM grid, linear referencing, referencing a page in a mapbook created for data collection, georeferencing images.  This project assessed the quality of the data and used ArcMap and the Spatial Analyst extension to create different distributions and all cartographic products. Results show that while the data does provide insight, citizen scientist projects should provide as much training as possible to achieve the best results.

Title:                     Range Size, Distribution, and Seasonal Activity Levels of Western Diamondback Rattlesnakes at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum

Author:                Ken Stockton, ken.stockton.mail@gmail.com

Keywords:          Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, Western Diamondback, Range Size, Seasonal Activity, Radio Telemetry

Abstract:              The Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum is a natural history interpretive facility situated in desert habitat just south of the Tucson Mountains. Its grounds and surrounding environment are home to many native species, including the western diamondback (Crotalus atrox). In an effort to better understand the habits and movements of this common rattlesnake in the context of a popular public facility, museum staff worked with a local veterinarian to surgically implant radio transmitters into the body cavities of wild, resident rattlesnakes, and subsequently used radio telemetry to locate and record their positions at regular intervals over an extended period. More than 2000 data points for two dozen animals were mapped and analyzed to determine how large an area was inhabited by each snake, whether distribution was affected by features of the physical or biological environment, how much variation occurred in monthly activity levels, and whether any overall trends could be identified as gender-specific.

Title:                     Pima County, Arizona Government Property Rights: Web application to show property owned by Pima County and utilized by others

Author:                                Lynn Marie Jarzombekljarzomb@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:          Government Property Rights, Geospatial, Pima County, Land Use, Web Application

Abstract:              The creation of a web application for employees of Pima County to be able to see what property in the county is owned by Pima County and if any of those parcels of land are being used by other entities.

While updating a legacy application that captured data associated with Pima County Governmental Property Rights, it was found that an entire subset of data had either been missed or misrepresented.  This limited the ability to identify Pima County owned property that was being utilized by lease, license, or easement by other jurisdictions or private entities and other data associated to the geographic location

Using the geodatabase model employed for the update will enable the dataset the ability for the graphic display on the web application to link with all data related to it. This many to many relationship allows for multiple documents to be linked to a single polygon, many polygons to be linked to a single document, many classification codes in a single document linked to many polygons, etc., and overlapping polygons can exist in this environment.

For displaying and accessing the geodatabase model a customized web application page is created using ArcSever by ESRI and Adobe Flashbuilder. This web page enables the user to select an area of interest and the database will provide a report with all the data associated with the selection in a highly understandable format. From that report the seeker can click on the link to the scanned image of the recorded document that Pima County and another party entered into.

 

Title:                     Overcoming Siting Challenges with GIS Predictive Models - Infrastructure Site Selection Based on Locations of Protected Resource Elements

 

Author:                Lirain Urreiztieta, lirainu@email.arizona.edu

 

Keywords:          Site Selection, Predictive Models, Sensitive Resources, Raster

 

Abstract:              The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires government agencies to evaluate the environmental impacts of proposed projects. For federal agencies, environmental review is based on the preparation of Environmental Assessments (EA) or Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) to identify and evaluate potential impacts to sensitive resources. This report documents the use of predictive modeling with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to identify areas with a low, medium or high probability of containing sensitive resources which could influence the siting and development of infrastructure. Data collected within the Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge in Lincoln County, Nevada provided locations and attributes of sensitive resource elements that were used to create a predictive model for the refuge. The model is based on reclassified grid themes developed by executing raster data operations with the goal of creating a composite map analyzing surface data. The resulting product is a predictive model-based map of the refuge that can be used by land managers and planners who are considering project feasibility for the development of infrastructure and preservation of sensitive resources.

 

Title:                     Landcover Change Detection in Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

 

Author:                Dietrich Walker, rdwalker@email.arizona.edu

 

Keywords:        Change Detection, Wildlife Refuge, Endangered Species Habitat, Landcover Change, Wetland Habitat

 

Abstract:            Surrounded by Nevada desert, the Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge in Lincoln County is a 5,380 acre ecological oasis of lakes, marshes, wet meadows and desert uplands. Located on the Pacific Flyway, the variety of lakes and wetlands of the refuge provide precious fish and wildlife habitat in the arid southern Nevada climate. Designated by The Nature Conservancy as one of the nation's prime biological "hotspots", the refuge is an essential stopover for hundreds of different species of birds, including several threatened and endangered species. This study attempts to analyze temporal landcover change within the refuge using remote sensing analysis techniques. Satellite imagery acquired over recent decades, including LANDSAT and commercial high-resolution data, was used to analyze landcover change from the 1980s to the 2000s by employing image differencing and post-classification comparison methods.  Percentages of landcover categories that have remained or changed are presented as a basis for further studies about possible causes of landcover change within the refuge. With so many wildlife species dependent upon the thin stretch of critical habitat that Pahranagat provides, analyzing the nature and direction of landcover change within the refuge is vital to future wildlife management decisions and policy-making.

 

Title:                     Social Interaction and Place Engagement: Evaluating Relationships Between Social Capital and Spatial Neighborhood Interaction within a Phoenix Neighborhood

Author:                Matthew Breed, mbreed@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:          Social Capital, Neighborhood, Phoenix, Spatial Analysis

Abstract:              Social capital is generally looked upon as being a constructive force due to the benefits gained from the mutual understanding, cooperation, and coordination that it fosters. A question that arises when investigating social capital is whether a relationship exists between the social capital characteristics an individual possesses and how that individual interacts with their environment in a spatial context.  This study serves to provide an answer to this question using GIS, linear regression, and spatial analysis investigation methods, utilizing data gathered from a National Science Foundation questionnaire distributed to 388 residents of the Garfield Neighborhood in Phoenix, Arizona. These surveys were distributed in order to discern demographic, social capital and social trust characteristics for each respondent. Additionally, location questions were asked and subsequently geocoded in order to obtain a geographical activity space for each survey participant. Questions designed to measure social capital were extracted from the survey, weighted, and indexed to assign a comprehensive social capital score to gauge the amount of social capital each participant possessed. Social capital scores were subsequently evaluated against both the demographic and activity space attributes for each survey participant using a combination of spatial analysis techniques and linear regression. Overall, the results indicate that correlations exits between social capital characteristics and spatial interaction attributes, however more detailed examination is warranted in order to identify the underlying causes of these relationships.

Title:                     Little Havana:  Civic Engagement, Social Trust and Capital in a Hispanic Miami Neighborhood

Author:                Elsbeth Hoggatt, elsbeth.hoggatt@gmail.com

Keywords:          Civic Engagement, Hispanic, Spatial Analysis, Neighborhood,  Little Havana

Abstract:              In 2006, 400 people were surveyed in the dominantly Hispanic neighborhood of Little Havana in Miami, Florida.  The survey consisted of 56 questions, ranging from demographics to activity space (where their kids attend school, where they grocery shop, etc.), social trust (based on a study conducted by the Pew Research Center) and social capital (based on the Social Capital Community Survey used in Robert D. Putnam’s Ethnic Diversity paper published in 2006).  We compiled the Putnam and Pew research surveys and indexed the questions and their responses based on a pre-determined weight.  For example, respondents who were registered to vote or participated in the last election were given a higher social trust weight than those who were not as politically active.  These indices were then compared to the respondents’ activity polygons in an attempt to determine whether or not there was a significant relationship between the area of a respondent’s activity space and their level of social trust and civic engagement. 

Title:                     Comparing Social Capital and Activity Area: How Survey Respondents Interact with Their Landscape Based on Their Sense of Community

Author:                Michael Robles, robles@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:          Social Capital, Trust, Pilsen, Chicago, Spatial Analysis

Abstract:              This project analyzes concepts of social capital and trust as compared to the activity space described by inhabitants in the neighborhood of Pilsen in Chicago, Illinois. Data from 402 surveys conducted in Pilsen in the mid-2000s for the National Science Foundation (NSF) was utilized to create a social capital index in order to assess how trusting and engaged people are with their neighbors and toward their neighborhood. Using this project’s index, each respondent was ultimately scored based on their answers, followed by an examination for correlation between these responses and area of activity. Further analysis was completed to determine the statistical significance of social capital on activity space. It is understood from this project’s end that the index reveals that there may be other variables of importance, in addition to those assessed.

Title:

Tactical Infrastructure:  Mapping the Environmental Impacts of the Border Wall in the Sky Island Bio-Region

Author:

Caroline Patrick-Birdwell, cpatrick@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:

Sky Islands, Border wall, wildlife corridors, US-Mexico border

Abstract:

The recent wall and fence construction along the US/Mexico border has created a number of problems for wildlife and watersheds, particularly in the Sky Island region of Arizona and New Mexico.  Research indicates that the clearing of vegetation, installation of high-powered lighting and land-filling of canyons and watercourses are affecting wildlife populations in the short and long term. Impacts from this construction reach far beyond the footprint of the wall, affecting the ability of plants and animals to move normally in the region. Habitat fragmentation and destruction are the most serious threats to wildlife populations and their habitats in the border region.  This project documents the actual footprint of the wall zone, providing a visual guide of the different types of infrastructure implemented, as well as the use of lighting, roadways, and recently installed Border Patrol stations. The comprehensive map produced from this project is designed for conservation advocacy purposes of the Sky Island region (especially in protected areas such as National Monuments, National Wildlife Refuges, Wilderness and Riparian Conservation Areas) and is the first map of its kind available for public use.

 

Title:                     The Regional Economic Impact Simulator: a WebGIS tool for Publich Outreach, Academic Research, and Policy Analysis

Authors:              Richard Morris, krmorris@email.arizona.edu; Fred Neasham, fred.neasham@gmail.com; Melissa Talley, mmtalley@gmail.com

Keywords:          Spatial Econometrics, Webgis, Flexviewer, Arcserver, Geoprocessing

Abstract:              The Regional Economic Impact Simulator (REIS) was constructed to allow for the investigation of spatial econometric data and real time policy analysis. It pertains to a theoretical scenario where a user selects the location, variable, and magnitude of change. The output of this simulation is a map showing the economic impact not only in the locality where the change took place, but also in its surrounding areas. Hence REIS displays clearly how economic changes dissipate over space, a phenomenon well-documented in the literature but barely displayed on a map.

The construction of the REIS required overcoming three major issues: the construction and management of a WebGIS environment; the development of a model that would simulate economic change across the counties of the contiguous United States; and the creation of an intuitive and easily navigable user interface.

                                The initial obstacle was the construction of a stable and accessible WebGIS environment for the immediate requirements of the project while keeping an eye on the possibility of further development in the future. The development of the work environment had to encapsulate the usual deliverables of project management such as scope and project definition as well as user testing and risk management. Alternatives for server environments and software Application Programming Interfaces were analyzed with a view towards sustainability and ease of development. The resulting decision led to a Microsoft operating system and DBMS supporting an ESRI ArcGIS and Flexviewer web environment.

In order to simulate economic change a complex geoprocessing tool was constructed and published to the WebGIS environment. The complexity came from the combining of Model Builder, in order to automate workflow, and a Python script that depended on a scientific library (numpy) necessary for complex calculations.

The user interface construction consisted of the development or repurposing of multipurpose widgets to handle map manipulation and navigation as well as the creation of cartographic displays that reflected the distribution of demographic and economic data and the output of a simulation. This relied on good data management: the creation of metadata, correcting dataset anomalies, and the ensuring of consistent datasets across platforms.

Validation of the approach is seen from the initial round of user testing providing strong positive feedback regarding accessibility and ease of use. However, we invite you to join in by experiencing the Regional Economic Impact Simulator at webgis.arizona.edu/reis.

 

Title:                     Designing Wildlife Corridors to Mitigate Human-Elephant Conflict in Africa

Author:                Benjamin Schaub, bschaub@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:          Wildlife Corridors, Africa, Elephants, Conflict, Cost-Distance Analysis

Abstract:              The African elephant (Loxodonta africana) is the largest living terrestrial animal on Earth. Its considerable demands for land and resources have brought the elephant into direct conflict with an ever increasing human population. Human-elephant conflict (HEC) exists where these human and elephant populations meet. Effective land-use planning is seen as the best long term solution to HEC. Because of the geographic nature of land-use planning, geographic information systems (GIS) can be used to propose the creation of new protected areas and wildlife corridors. This study used GIS to mitigate HEC by identifying protected areas with elephant population densities greater than 0.5 animals per km2, the unsustainable population threshold, which would benefit from the creation of a wildlife corridor. Forty-seven areas were identified as having unsustainable populations using ESRI’s ArcGIS 10.0 software. After these areas were identified, neighboring protected areas with low elephant population densities were considered for the terminus of a potential wildlife corridor. Analysis showed that twenty-three of the forty-seven areas would benefit from a corridor. Eighteen potential corridors were proposed and prioritized based on their biological importance, current threats, and potential opportunity. One high priority corridor in Malawi between the Nkhotakota Wildlife Refuge and Kasungu National Park was selected as a case study. A habitat suitability model of the area was created and used to develop a resistance (travel cost) model. A cost-distance analysis was then performed and a corridor representing the most permeable ten percent of the landscape was selected to create the final corridor model.

Title:                     Envisioning the Tangerine Road Corridor through a Land Use model.

Author:                Matt Stuart, mes23@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:          Marana, AZ, CommunityViz, Land Use, Tangerine Road, Economic Development

Abstract:              Tangerine Road in Marana, AZ has been identified by the Regional Transportation Authority as a major northern route for the Tucson metropolitan area for East/West directional traffic.  It is also a main artery for connecting the Town of Oro Valley to Interstate 10.  The Marana Economic Road Map points out the Tangerine Road corridor “…as a key location for high technology businesses and business park development.”  Using the Marana General Plan, The Marana Economic Road Map and the Draft Marana Habitat Conservation Plan, analysis was conducted on the roughly 6 mile stretch of road, encompassing over 6,000 acres of land.  The analysis provided for the location and size of developable as well as further possible constraints for development.  Working in collaboration with members of the Town of Marana Development Services division, a land use scenario based on 6 distinct districts was created.  Each district is dictated by a different arrangement of land use percentages, giving them a distinctive theme and the ability to cluster.  Utilizing scholarly work to outline the potential economic development, ArcGIS and the CommunityViz software provided by Pathways, LLC, this paper will look at the specific economic impacts defined by the land use and create a 3D visualization for District 2, Industrial and R&D.

Title:                     Profiling Serial Crime: A Geographic Analysis of the Cleveland Torso Murders

Author:                Luke Moussa, lgmoussa@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:          Geographic Profiling; The Mad Butcher of Kingsbury Run; Torso Killer; Cleveland Torso Murders

Abstract:              The method of profiling serial criminals is not a recent phenomenon nor is the existence of those serial criminals who are profiled.  The FBI employs forensic psychologists, criminal analysts, computer networks, and contracts external consultants to assist in the apprehension of serial criminals. One tool which is being increasingly adopted by law enforcement is the science of Geographic Profiling. This type of analysis is used in a crime series that consist of three or more incidents in a specific geographic area. Geographic Profiling takes into account many factors such as, pattern analysis, specific type/nature of crime, temporal characteristics, and human psychology. This study will attempt to qualify, or disqualify, the primary suspect believed to be killer in the unsolved serial murder series that took place in Cleveland from 1934-1950. This study will focus on the spatial attributes and characteristics associated with the crime scenes, witness reports, police files, and geographic locations that qualify as anchor points to be used in the profile.  In addition, this study will explore the psyche, typology, and methods of serial murders; these methods will be used to assist the profile and qualify the suspect.

Title:                     Mobile Applications for Mass Transit Using ESRI ArcGIS Server and the Android API

Author:                Casey Boettcher, caseyhb@email.arizona.edu 

Keywords:          Transportation, Networks, Buses, Mobile, Tucson

Abstract:              Tucson, Arizona is a city in the process of expanding its mass transit system. With the aim of promoting ridership, this project used bus route and stop data from the University of Arizona and Tucson’s SunTran bus system to create a mobile application that provides routing information to bus riders on their mobile devices. The source data that formed the basis of the service consumed by the client application began as separate centerline, street and bus route polyline layers.  To properly model cost, these layers were combined and bus routes were segmented at their stops. Cost attributes of distance and time for pedestrian travel were either taken directly from the street layer (distance) or calculated as a function of the distance of the street segment divided by a constant walking rate of five km/h (in the case of time). The resulting route and stop layers provided the basis for a network dataset which was then built and published to an instance of ArcGIS Server in Amazon’s EC2. The client, a native Android application, queries the server with departure and destination coordinates, receiving back a route that optimizes travel time for the rider.

Title:                     Southwestern Willow Flycatcher Breeding Habitats: Building a Geoprocessing Tool for Online Distribution

Author:                Jonathan Haller, jmhaller@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:          Raster Analysis, Geoprocessing, Habitat, Riparian, Remote Sensing

Abstract:              Diminishing breeding habitat for the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher has led to alarming declines in population. Large scale riparian mitigation across the Southwest has stabilized some of the breeding areas. Using a multiscaled breeding habitat model, mitigation projects can determine on a large scale what areas are best suited for breeding habitat. Creating geoprocessing tools which operate the model that users of any skill level can use is increasingly important in the workforce. This project developed a geoprocessing tool that utilizes the multiscaled breeding habitat model and raster files from Landsat and Digital Elevation Models. ArcGIS Model Builder was the base for the tool design with adjustments using Python script interface. Using existing ArcGIS Spatial Analyst tools I was able to design the geoprocessing tool so that all levels of the raster analysis are executed in the correct order and loaded into the raster calculator that provides the final output using the probability equation from the habitat model. It was developed so that minimal understanding of the process is needed, requiring only the selection of raster data. The tool was then published so that internal network and online distribution would allow any number of users to interact with the base raster data.

Title:                     Gap Analysis of the Eastern Shore of Virginia: Determining target areas for  restoration and acquisition for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS)

Author:                Alana Hoye, ahoye001@email.arizona.edu       

Keywords:          Gap Analysis, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Endangered and Threatened Species, Land Cover Analysis, Raster Reclassification

Abstract:              The Eastern Shore of VA is part of the Delmarva Peninsula that is flanked by the Atlantic Ocean on the eastern side and the Chesapeake Bay on its western side.  The Eastern Shore is comprised of two counties: Accomack and Northampton. This Gap analysis is for federal priority species and their habitats on the Eastern Shore.   This region is a critical area for migratory birds and has one of the highest concentrations of tier 1-4 species. The tier 1-4 species are ranked based on threat levels and possible extinction of the species.   The project’s analysis is closing gaps in the protection of federally endangered and threatened species and their specific habitats.  Due to the high costs of restoration and acquisition, efforts must be focused in high priority areas.   The major objectives of this project are to (1) identify protected species within specified land cover types that are currently under federal protection, (2) identify and produce species GIS databases and cartographic products describing distributions, land stewardship, and land management status versus areas that will have the biggest impact with appropriate restoration and acquisition.  The final product includes cartographic products and databases depicting areas that should be targeted for restoration, acquisition, and protection throughout the partners’ program.

Title:

GIS and Mobile Application Design: Using Complex Queries to Determine the Availability of Food Delivery Services within the Tucson Area

Author:

David Olson, dao@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:

Spatial Analysis, Food Industry, Delivery, Mobile Application, Database Design

Abstract:

The advent of smart phones with handheld Global Positioning Systems (GPS) has brought mobile mapping technology directly to consumers. The increased functionality of mobile web-mapping applications such as Google and Bing Maps has made it possible for restaurant customers to easily locate nearby services. While these applications have been successful, they currently offer no method for displaying only the businesses that cater to a user’s current location and time. This paper presents the results of a mobile application that utilizes GPS coordinates to query a spatial database of delivery zones and operating hours and displays the results on a base map. The application indicates that user location, preference and current time can successfully be used to determine and display available services.

 

 

Title:                     Using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) for Vegetation Mapping in the Rincon Mountain District (RMD) of Saguaro National Park

Author:                Daniel Stauning, destauning@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:          LiDAR, Vegetation Characterization, Saguaro National Park, Sonoran Desert Inventory and Monitoring Network

Abstract:              Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is a remote sensing technology with unique applications in natural resource monitoring. In 2008, LiDAR data were collected in Pima County through public funding by the Pima Association of Governments (PAG). The measurements were repeated in 2011 and were expanded to include the Rincon Mountain District (RMD) of Saguaro National Park. As a tool for vegetation characterization, LiDAR data can provide precise measurements of canopy height, volume and reflectance values. It can also be used with multispectral satellite imagery to further enhance image classification techniques.

The goal of this project is to use LiDAR in conjunction with multi-spectral satellite imagery to map and describe the vegetation community composition and structure of RMD. An unsupervised classification was performed and the accuracy was assessed by referencing long term vegetation monitoring plot data from the National Park Service (NPS) – Sonoran Desert Inventory and Monitoring Network.  The plot data was also used to help define training areas for a supervised classification. This project builds on the work of the NPS vegetation mapping program, the goal of which is to map and describe the vegetation of NPS units.

 

Title:

Mexico Immigrants in Two USA Neighborhoods: A look into Garfield in Phoenix Arizona and Pilsen in Chicago Illinois

Author:

Dennis Kokosky, dkokosky@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:

Phoenix, Chicago, neighborhood, Mexico, immigrants

Abstract:

There are two neighborhoods in the United States that are heavily influence by immigrants from Mexico: Garfield and Pilsner. Garfield is a square mile neighborhood within the city of Phoenix, Arizona where it consists of 10,000 people as of the 2000 census.  Hispanic make up 86 percent of the population and 68 percent of residents are foreign-born.  Pilsen is a neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois where it too has a very high percentage of Hispanics.  This study compared and contrasted the two neighborhoods about the Mexican immigrants.  For instance, the state of a Sonora in Mexico has a higher number people immigrating to Garfield while having none relocating to Pilsner.   There were a variety of other aspects looked into such as remittances back to Mexico, length in United States, year entered United States, and clustering of Mexican states within each neighborhood.  I used Geographic Information Systems to visually showcase the different aspects of the two areas. 

 

Title:                     Living Beyond 100: Society, Change, and the New Longevity

Author:                Trevor Self, trevorself@gmail.com

Keywords:          Life Expectancy, Age, Aging, Health, Space-Time Analysis, Income, Race

Abstract:              As part of a University of Arizona College of Science 6-part lecture series this coming spring (2012) called Living Beyond 100 that is addressing the effects of long lifespans, this project compares life expectancy data from the United Nations, Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation, and United States Census in order to find patterns and variables that correlate with higher (and lower) life expectancies. By highlighting changes in life expectancy from 1950-2010, this project also quantitatively illustrates the impact of war, famine, natural disasters, genocides, and public health crises on the life expectancies of populations. This project also studies the effects of race, income, and gender on life expectancy on a county-by-county basis in the United States and in Arizona. Possible influential factors in determining life expectancy by county may be socioeconomic status, race, or access to healthcare facilities. Migration patterns may also be considered in the raising or lowering of life expectancy by county within Arizona.

Title:                     Modeling Soil Erosion Potential on the Barry M. Goldwater Range - West

Author:                Jennifer Psillas, jpsillas@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:          Erosion, Universal Soil Loss Equation, Off-road vehicles, Barry M. Goldwater Range, Monitoring

Abstract:              The Barry M. Goldwater Range – West (BMGR-West), managed by the U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, is nearly 1,100 square miles of remote, largely undisturbed Sonoran Desert habitat.  Within the BMGR-West, however, there are areas which are disturbed by off-road vehicle (ORV) use by the U.S. Marine Corps and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection.  These disturbed areas have the potential to increase soil erosion and ecosystem degradation on the Range.  Part of BMGR-West’s Inventory and Monitoring Plan requires establishment of soil erosion monitoring sites.  Because BMGR-West covers a large area, soil erosion potential maps will help locate these monitoring sites.  This project uses study areas within the Range to test the effects of adding ORV data to the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) in order to model soil erosion potential.  Off-road vehicle use was digitized using high-resolution (1-foot) aerial photography and integrated into the USLE Cover factor.  The resulting soil erosion potential models were compared to the non-ORV models.  The results from this project will determine if the same method will be used to model soil erosion potential across the entire Range.

Title:

USA Drone Strikes: Spatial analysis of drone strikes and Suicide Bombers in Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Yemen

Author:

Amani  Fayed, amanifayed@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:

Drone Strikes, Suicide Bombers,  Al Qaeda, Taliban, Hakkani

Abstract:

This research analyzes the U.S. use of the un-manned aerial vehicle technology as a counterterrorism instrument in Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Yemen, as well as the increase and decrease of suicide bombing. Using data on U.S. drone strikes and suicide bombers from November 2002- October 2011. Initial analysis shows cluster of drone strikes in Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas.  Although initial analysis shows a positive correlation between drone strikes and violence generally in the area, it also shows decline in suicide bombers activity. Using Geographic Information Systems, this research provides analysis of both drone strikes and suicide bombing incidences. Results indicate that there is a cluster of drone strikes in Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas. As well as significant increase in drone strikes starting 2008 and through 2009 - 2010. This research also mapped the drone strikes and suicide bombing incidents to the administrative divisions at the agency level where they occurred.

 

Title:                     Spatial Analysis of Mountain Lion Movement and Habitat Use near Prescott, Payson, and Tucson, Arizona

Author:                Rita Sulkosky, rsulkosky@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:          GIS, Spatial Analysis, Kernel Density Analysis, Hawth’s Tools, Mountain Lion 

Abstract:              Increased populations of both humans and mountain lions in Arizona have lead to a greater need for understanding mountain lion habitat use and interactions with their environment. GIS and spatial analysis provide powerful tools for understanding patterns in animal movement and habitat use. This project used GPS collar data collected by the Arizona Game and Fish Department from 2005-2008. Position fixes from the collars were used to estimate home ranges for 22 male lions and 8 female lions using kernel density analysis. Percent volume contours were calculated from the kernel density analysis to show areas of 95% probability for each animal’s occurrence and 50% probability, known as the animal’s core area. These estimated home ranges were compared to land cover data to assess habitat selection for each lion. ESRI’s Tracking Analyst extension and Spatial Ecology’s Hawth’s Tools were utilized for visualization of both spatial and temporal patterns in movement of mountain lions throughout their home range. Overlapping areas of estimated home ranges were calculated to evaluate possible interactions between multiple cats.  Mountain lion movements across roads and urban areas were analyzed for a greater understanding of how these animals interact with human environments.

Title:                     Incident Analysis and Fire Department Expansion in Tonopah, Arizona

 

Author:                Dacey Zelman-Fahm, dmzelman@email.arizona.edu

 

Keywords:          Boundary Expansion, Fire District, Station Location, Incident Analysis, Response Time

 

Abstract:              This project maps fire and medical incident trends in Tonopah, Arizona to advance current fire department efficiency. The project modeled trends to assist the local fire department in a number of various planning projects. The first, being the expansion of district boundaries to increase tax revenue. This expansion was executed by implementing Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to query adjacent land parcels which met the department’s criteria and merged them into the current district. Following the expansion, a location was identified to construct a future fire station within the new boundaries. This site had to deliver optimal fire and medical coverage and contribute to a reduction in response times. The data provided by Tonopah Valley Fire Department is response call data between 2005 and 2010 and current district boundaries. The attribute data provided response call location, incident type, response time, and incident date and time.  Utilizing location data, calls were geocoded to produce a point density map which revealed patterns, exposed trends, and isolated areas of high response call volume. A travel time model was then yielded by running a network analysis to identify gaps in coverage. The future station location was determined through what-if scenarios using possible future locations and historical response times. The results produced a dynamic map that incorporated the new district boundaries and future fire station coverage.

Title:                     Mapping Tucson’s Home Vacancy Rate

Author:                Michael Lyons, lyons@email.arizona.edu

Keywords:          Tucson, Vacancies, Choropleth, Normalizing

Abstract:              In an article by the Arizona Daily Star dated 10/30/2011, Tucson’s worsening home vacancy rate is addressed.  As a part of their analysis the star created choropleth maps of Tucson in 2000 and 2010 showing the total housing vacancies by Census tract.  This is a flawed way to derive a map showing the hardest hit areas from the statistical data because it fails to take into account the total number of housing units that each census tract contains.  The total number of vacancies must be normalized with the total number of housing units.  The census data shows us that Tucson is indeed one of “America’s emptiest cities”, that it had the highest vacancy rate in the entire country in mid 2010.  What it does not readily show us is: where in Tucson are the hardest hit areas?  The purpose of this project was to map this data and answer this question using conventional cartographic techniques.  Data was collected from the U.S. Census Bureau.  GIS software was used to project the normalized data into two maps, one of 2000 and one of 2010, showing the percent of properties that are vacant. The same breaks are used in both maps allowing the user to compare the two maps, another convention overlooked by the Star.  The results demonstrate that certain areas in midtown Tucson were not as badly affected as the Star’s map indicate, while some areas, such as the Catalina foothills area, were worse off.