Courses

Fall 2015 Courses

 

Co-Convened (400/500) Classes

GEOG516F - GIS for Social Sciences (Christopherson)

An advanced course for students who want to integrate social science data and geographic information science into their research or work life.  The course is presented in a lecture/laboratory format.  The lecture portion will deal with conceptual issues necessary for the integration of social science data and approaches within a GIS framework.  The laboratory portion will provide practical experience with GIS software products used for the development and analysis of spatially-referenced social science data sets.  Graduate-level requirements include a 15 page term paper dealing with the integration of social science and GIS. Specific topics must be agreed upon in advance with the instructor. The paper will be completed in stages and due dates for selecting a topic, and for the completion of a précis, an outline and the paper will be posted on the course D2L site.

GEOG 517 - Geographic Information Systems for Natural and Social Sciences (Christopherson)

This course introduction to the application of GIS and related technologies for both the natural and social sciences. Conceptual issues in GIS database design and development, analysis, and display.

GEOG538 - Biogeography (Barron-Gafford)

Biogeography explores past and present distributions of life and its interactions with Earth. In this course we move from Pangea to the Anthropocene, and combine evolutionary and ecological perspectives to show how Earth history and contemporary environments have shaped species distributions and nearly all patterns of biodiversity. Shortly, the interplay between biota and our changing environment through time and space will be pursued and how it relates to species migration, conservation, extinction and climate change. During this course you get to explore and analyze some data and discuss your view of all life on Earth.

GEOG  597F - Community and School Garden Workshop (TBA)

This workshop-based course is designed to enable UA undergraduates and graduates students to work in Tucson-area schools helping students and teachers to undertake the design, construction, planting, harvesting and preparation of foods from a local school garden.  The workshop also involves preparing or assembling curriculum materials to enable teachers and students to teach and learn about food production, food histories and geographies, and food politics.  The course includes an intensive workshop sponsored by the Tucson Community Food Bank.  In addition to attending that workshop, students are also expected to attend at least one fieldtrip among the two that are organized during the semester as well as attend monthly meetings of the group on the UA campus. Most of the workshop, however, revolves around consistent and engaged involvement with a Tucson school and its teachers and students supporting the development and maintenance of school garden and attendant curriculum.

 

Graduate Classes

GEOG 596I - Comparative and International Water Policy (Bauer)

This course examines major issues in comparative and international water policy, including water markets, privatization, dams and river basin management, environmental flows, social equity, and water governance. The course is interdisciplinary and builds on law, geography, political economy, and institutional economics.

GEO 590 - Remote Sensing Planet Earth (van Leeuwen)

Remote Sensing for the Study of Planet Earth introduces basic and applied remote sensing science as a means to explore the diversity of our planetary environments (biosphere, atmosphere, lithosphere and hydrosphere) within the radiometric, spectral, spatial, angular and temporal domains of remote sensing systems. This survey course strikes a balance between theory, applications and hands-on labs. We explore how you can download, process, analyze and interpret multi-sensor data and integrate online remotely sensed data sources/products into your research of interest.

GEOG 689 - History of Geographic Thought (Oglesby)

This course explores the terrain of geographic thought and development with a particular emphasis on 20th and 21st century innovations in disciplinary thinking. Students are challenged to take up topics that are both central to their own work and the work of their colleagues, so that they can situate each other's projects in the historical developments of the discipline. The course is designed to therefore introduce students to the breadth of geographic thinking, from its traditional connection to the physical sciences to its engagements with social theoretical and humanistic thinking. The overall goal, then, is for students to better understand Geography's current pluralistic state as a multi-pronged and multi-theoretical (inter)disciplinary project.

DVP 601 - Principles of Social Science for Development: themes, theories, and strategies (Doshi)

This course will introduce students to key social science analytical tools relevant to development. It provides training in major development theories and practices through a social justice and rights-based lens and prepares students to understand how relations of power at local and global scales intersect with and shape development efforts.

DVP 602 - The Role of Culture in Sustainable Development (Doshi)

This course emphasizes the cultural and spatial dimensions to development practice and promotes sensitivity to the unique development practice challenges related to language and culture. Students are exposed to a range of regional contexts and are expected to expand their knowledge and understanding of a specific cultural area. The specific regional themes focus on the impacts of culture on problems related to health and nutrition, natural resource management, governance, and economic decision-making, among other. Faculty from different core competency disciplines will participate in this course.

DVP 631 - Research Tools and Applications for Development Practice (Finan)

Building on the introductory methods course, this course reinforces the basic qualitative and qualitative tool set, including rapid appraisal, participatory appraisal, formal surveys, team ethnography, and so forth. The course further introduces the use of GIS, remote sensing, and other techniques into development problem solving (e.g. in community vulnerability mapping). This course also focuses on the skills needed for the management and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data using standard software packages, as well as the professional interpretation and presentation of findings. Students will apply these techniques to data collected during the previous summer field practicum, in this way integrating the applied field experience into the classroom. Student teams research projects, in collaboration with community partners.

DVP 640 -  Methods in Development Practice (Finan)

This course introduces students to the "culture of inquiry", the basic principles of applied, problem-solving research, and the logic of a mixed methods approach. It then relates research methodology to the development context as defined by the project cycle and project design principles, information systems and management, livelihood and vulnerability assessment (including health, nutrition, and environmental assessment), community and participatory planning, project monitoring and evaluation, and proposal development. In providing a comprehensive overview of the role of information in development, the course is designed to build decision skills in the choice of method and the management of information. Instruction will be provided by faculty and practitioner experts in these fields.

DVP 641 - Global Classroom: Foundations of Sustainable Development (Buechler)

This course is designed to foster cross-border and cross-disciplinary collaboration through web-conferencing, online portals for interactive communication, and shared course management sites and to provide students with an introduction to the core competency areas and practical skills required of a development practitioner. The course provides students with a general introduction to the basic core competencies and practical skills required of a generalist or integrative development practitioner and serves as the foundation course for the Master’s in Development Practice (MDP) curriculum.

 

Professional Development Series

GEOG 695B - Professional Development Seminar (TBA)

 

Graduate Seminar Series

GEOG 696I, Political Ecology (Osborne)

This course is a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding resource access by different people, the institutions and environmental conditions through which resource access is mediated, and the sorts of environmental change that these systems may create.  It also involves an analysis of the political institutions that have a bearing on environmental outcomes.  It frames local resource use systems within the 'nests' of processes that help to shape them - e.g. political economy, globalization, gender relations, and historically produced 'narratives.'

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Spring 2015 Courses

Co-Convened (400/500) Classes

GEOG 516A  - Computer Cartography (Christopherson)
This course introduces the principles of map design, production and analysis.

GEOG  516C - Urban Geographic Information Systems (Tong)
Introduces concepts and application skills for use of geographic information systems to investigate a range of urban spatial issues and decision-making processes.  Emphasis on complete process of GIS-based problem solving, including project planning, spatial data sources/acquisition, preparation/coding, analysis, representation, and communication.

GEOG 517 - Geographic Information Systems for Natural and Social Sciences (Christopherson)
This course introduction to the application of GIS and related technologies for both the natural and social sciences. Conceptual issues in GIS database design and development, analysis, and display.

GEOG  520 - Advanced Geographic Information Systems (Christopherson)
This course examines various areas of advanced GIS applications such as dynamic segmentation, surface modeling, spatial statistics, and network modeling. The use of high performance workstations will be emphasized.
   
GEOG  530 - The Climate System (Glueck)
This course is a systematic examination of processes and circulations comprising Earth's climate. The emphasis is on developing an understanding of the basics of the climate system; the earth-sun relationships that drive climate, and the global energy and water balances.  Students will learn about the natural processes that control the climate system and how they interact, and how these interactions translate to climate on the ground in different regions.

GEOG  569 - Water Resource Assessment  (formerly 567, Scott)
This course focuses on watersheds, aquifers, and river basins as sources of water to meet human and environmental demands. Techniques covered include watershed delineation, water budget calculation, safe yield estimation, water quality assessment (total maximum daily load). MODSIM, MODFLOW, and WEAP decision support systems are reviewed.

GEOG  583 - Remote Sensing Land Use and Land Cover  (van Leeuwen)
Local to global scale land use and land cover are examined using multi spatial and temporal scale remote sensing data. This course will be a mix of lectures and hands-on labs and assignments to access, preprocess, classify and analyze our dynamic world using multispectral and LiDAR airborne and satellite data at weekly, monthly, yearly and decadal time steps. We will focus on problems related to land use and planning, resource management, climate and wildfire impacts and other topics.

GEOG  597F - Community and School Garden Workshop (Marston)
This workshop-based course is designed to enable UA undergraduates and graduates students to work in Tucson-area schools helping students and teachers to undertake the design, construction, planting, harvesting and preparation of foods from a local school garden.  The workshop also involves preparing or assembling curriculum materials to enable teachers and students to teach and learn about food production, food histories and geographies, and food politics.  The course includes an intensive workshop sponsored by the Tucson Community Food Bank.  In addition to attending that workshop, students are also expected to attend at least one fieldtrip among the two that are organized during the semester as well as attend monthly meetings of the group on the UA campus. Most of the workshop, however, revolves around consistent and engaged involvement with a Tucson school and its teachers and students supporting the development and maintenance of school garden and attendant curriculum.
 

Graduate Classes

GEOG 500 – Research Design (Wilder)

GEOG 579 – Spatial Statistics and Spatial Econometrics (Dall' erba)
This course provides the statistical and econometric techniques required for the analysis of geocoded data. It includes the identification of spatial heterogeneity and inclusion in a formal regression model. An important aspect of the course is to gain hands-on experience in applying the appropriate techniques and using state-of-the-art software.

GEOG 596B - Arizona Water Policy (Megdal)
This course focuses on current Arizona water policy from a multi-disciplinary perspective.  Through readings, research, lectures, discussions and presentations, the student is exposed to major, current water resource issues facing Arizona and other parts of the West and policies to address them.  The faculty draw upon their and guest-lecturers' experiences to demonstrate the development, analysis and implementation of real-world water policy.

GEOG 596M - Making the Connection between Science and Decision Making (Woodhouse)
This seminar explores concepts at the intersection between environmental science and decision making, including scientific information supply and demand, boundary organizations, co-production of knowledge, and knowledge networks, as well the political context for decision making. It also includes practical aspects of two-way communication, exploring the ways in which exchanges take place between scientists and decision makers who can include resource management professionals, planners, policy makers, NGOs, and the general public. It is for both physical and social science students from a broad range of backgrounds.
    

Professional Development Series

GEOG 695B - Professional Development Seminar (Woodhouse)

GEOG 695C - Preparing Future Faculty: College Teaching (Banister)
Required to teach an SGD course

GEOG 695D - Writing Workshop (Marston)

 

Graduate Seminar Series

GEOG 696B – Seminar in Cultural Geography (Myadar)

The aim of the seminar is to critically explore the geographies of culture. Rather than treating culture as ontologically unambiguous object to be studied, the course explores the ways in which the ideas of culture(s) are produced, contested, and renegotiated as they intersect with power, place, and identity. To situate this intersection, the seminar pays specific attention to the complex dialectics of territorialization, deterritorialization and reterritorialization of identification and difference.

GEOG 696F – Seminar in Advanced Methods and Techniques (Lukinbeal)

This course will introduce the fundamental concepts of geographic information systems technology (GIST).  It combines an overview of the general principles of GIScience and how to apply these principles through a series of practical labs using ESRI’s ArcGIS software.  This course also provides an introduction to spatial analysis, geodatabases, data models and python coding. Registration with approval by instructor (please talk to Chris Lukinbeal).

GEOG 696H – Seminar: The Subjects and Objects of Political Geography (Banister)

This seminar is an in-depth exploration of the study of subjects and objects in political geography and of the ways that research and political praxis are differently shaped by the use of these two distinct but not mutually exclusive categories. From geography and political ecology to Science and Technology Studies (STS), researchers have turned more and more toward explorations of the material, moving from a focus on processes of subject formation toward analysis of ‘things,’ ‘objects,’ ‘hybrids,’ ‘assemblages,’ ‘quasi objects,’ etc.  We will look closely at this ‘evolution,’ and in particular at its implications for defining and carrying out research in political geography.

 

Fall 2014 Courses

 

Co-Convened (400/500) Classes

GEOG516F - GIS for Social Sciences (Christopherson)

An advanced course for students who want to integrate social science data and geographic information science into their research or work life.  The course is presented in a lecture/laboratory format.  The lecture portion will deal with conceptual issues necessary for the integration of social science data and approaches within a GIS framework.  The laboratory portion will provide practical experience with GIS software products used for the development and analysis of spatially-referenced social science data sets.  Graduate-level requirements include a 15 page term paper dealing with the integration of social science and GIS. Specific topics must be agreed upon in advance with the instructor. The paper will be completed in stages and due dates for selecting a topic, and for the completion of a précis, an outline and the paper will be posted on the course D2L site.

GEOG 517 - Geographic Information Systems for Natural and Social Sciences (Christopherson)

This course introduction to the application of GIS and related technologies for both the natural and social sciences. Conceptual issues in GIS database design and development, analysis, and display.

GEOG538 - Biogeography (Barron-Gafford)

Biogeography explores past and present distributions of life and its interactions with Earth. In this course we move from Pangea to the Anthropocene, and combine evolutionary and ecological perspectives to show how Earth history and contemporary environments have shaped species distributions and nearly all patterns of biodiversity. Shortly, the interplay between biota and our changing environment through time and space will be pursued and how it relates to species migration, conservation, extinction and climate change. During this course you get to explore and analyze some data and discuss your view of all life on Earth.

GEOG 563 -  Economic and Environmental Input-Output Analysis (Dall’erba)

This course provides the theory, techniques and hands-on experience necessary to understand input-output and its applications to a set of economic and environmental issues. Input-output has the capacity to measure linkages and the propagation of an economic or environmental shock across sectors and regions of an economy. It is commonly used for transportation planning, disaster relief, energy forecasting, environmental analysis (pollution attribution), social accounting models, and quantifying the impact of a terrorist attack. An important aspect of the course is to gain hands-on experience by applying the appropriate techniques and perform impact analysis with Microsoft Excel and PyIO (Python Input-Output).

GEOG  597F - Community and School Garden Workshop (Marston)

This workshop-based course is designed to enable UA undergraduates and graduates students to work in Tucson-area schools helping students and teachers to undertake the design, construction, planting, harvesting and preparation of foods from a local school garden.  The workshop also involves preparing or assembling curriculum materials to enable teachers and students to teach and learn about food production, food histories and geographies, and food politics.  The course includes an intensive workshop sponsored by the Tucson Community Food Bank.  In addition to attending that workshop, students are also expected to attend at least one fieldtrip among the two that are organized during the semester as well as attend monthly meetings of the group on the UA campus. Most of the workshop, however, revolves around consistent and engaged involvement with a Tucson school and its teachers and students supporting the development and maintenance of school garden and attendant curriculum.

 

Graduate Classes

GEOG  574G - Introduction to Geostatistics (Tong)
Exploratory spatial data analysis, random function models for spatial data, estimation and modeling of variograms and covariances, ordinary and universal kriging estimators and equations, regularization of variograms, estimation of spatial averages, non-linear estimators, includes use of geostatistical software. Application of hydrology, soil science, ecology, geography and related fields.

GEOG590 - Remote Sensing Planet Earth (van Leeuwen)

Remote Sensing for the Study of Planet Earth introduces basic and applied remote sensing science as a means to explore the diversity of our planetary environments (biosphere, atmosphere, lithosphere and hydrosphere) within the radiometric, spectral, spatial, angular and temporal domains of remote sensing systems. This survey course strikes a balance between theory, applications and hands-on labs. We explore how you can download, process, analyze and interpret multi-sensor data and integrate online remotely sensed data sources/products into your research of interest.

GEOG 689 - History of Geographic Thought (Del Casino, Jones)

This course explores the terrain of geographic thought and development with a particular emphasis on 20th and 21st century innovations in disciplinary thinking. Students are challenged to take up topics that are both central to their own work and the work of their colleagues, so that  they can situate each other's projects in the historical developments of the discipline. The course is designed to therefore introduce students to the breadth of geographic thinking, from its traditional connection to the physical sciences to its engagements with social theoretical and humanistic thinking. The overall goal, then, is for students to better understand Geography's current pluralistic state as a multi-pronged and multi-theoretical (inter)disciplinary project.

 

Professional Development Series

GEOG 695B - Professional Development Seminar (Wilder/Woodhouse)

 

Graduate Seminar Series

GEOG696H: Political Geography (Marston)

This course will consist of a seminar format allowing different topics in political geography to be presented.  Topics offered will likely include the state, governance, critical geopolitics, social movements, or an exclusive focus on a number of key political/social theorists inside and outside of the discipline of geography from Frederich Ratzel, to Karl Marx to David Harvey.

GEOG  696I - Political Ecology (Wilder)

This course is a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding resource access by different people, the institutions and environmental conditions through which resource access is mediated, and the sorts of environmental change that these systems may create.  It also involves an analysis of the political institutions that have a bearing on environmental outcomes.  It frames local resource use systems within the 'nests' of processes that help to shape them - e.g. political economy, globalization, gender relations, and historically produced 'narratives.'

GEOG  696K - Development and the Latin American Experience (Oglesby)

The aims of this course are to 1) introduce students to general theories of development from development studies, anthropology, geography and related fields, 2) introduce students to critiques of development practices that have emerged from the Latin American experience, and 3) provide an opportunity for students to compare experiences from their own work (within or outside of Latin America) with the general theories and case studies offered in class.

GEOG  696Q - Participatory Systems Design and Delivery (Bailey)

This seminar is a graduate experience intended to improve the participants' ability to design, deliver and measure the performance of Participatory and Collaborative Systems (PCS) in their own work and research.  The seminar covers philosophical considerations of PCS, performs a survey across a range of participatory and collaborative methods, and examines state-of-the-art efforts in PCS across a range of disciplines and application domains using case studies from a range of journals.  To the degree possible during the semester, there will be active participation in a mandated public meeting process.

 

Spring 2014 Courses

 

Co-Convened (400/500) Classes

GEOG 516A  - Computer Cartography (Christopherson)
This course introduces the principles of map design, production and analysis.

GEOG 516E – Geovisualization (Bailey)
This course introduces principles and practices of Geovisualization (Geoviz) and softwares (Community and ERDAS Image).
.
GEOG 517 - Geographic Information Systems for Natural and Social Sciences (Christopherson)
This course introduction to the application of GIS and related technologies for both the natural and social sciences. Conceptual issues in GIS database design and development, analysis, and display.

GEOG  520 - Advanced Geographic Information Systems (Christopherson)
This course examines various areas of advanced GIS applications such as dynamic segmentation, surface modeling, spatial statistics, and network modeling. The use of high performance workstations will be emphasized.
   
GEOG  530 - The Climate System (Glueck)
This course is a systematic examination of processes and circulations comprising Earth's climate. The emphasis is on developing an understanding of the basics of the climate system; the earth-sun relationships that drive climate, and the global energy and water balances.  Students will learn about the natural processes that control the climate system and how they interact, and how these interactions translate to climate on the ground in different regions.

GEOG 547 – Global and Regional Climatology (Hirschboeck and Russell)
This course includes the description and analysis of the atmospheric circulation process that produces differences in climates throughout the world. The emphasis is on the earth's problem climates and climatically sensitive zones most susceptible to floods, droughts, and other environmental stresses due to global change.

GEOG  583 - Remote Sensing Land Use and Land Cover  (van Leeuwen)
Local to global scale land use and land cover are examined using multi spatial and temporal scale remote sensing data. This course will be a mix of lectures and hands-on labs and assignments to access, preprocess, classify and analyze our dynamic world using multispectral and LiDAR airborne and satellite data at weekly, monthly, yearly and decadal time steps. We will focus on problems related to land use and planning, resource management, climate and wildfire impacts and other topics.

GEOG  597F - Community and School Garden Workshop (Marston)
This workshop-based course is designed to enable UA undergraduates and graduates students to work in Tucson-area schools helping students and teachers to undertake the design, construction, planting, harvesting and preparation of foods from a local school garden.  The workshop also involves preparing or assembling curriculum materials to enable teachers and students to teach and learn about food production, food histories and geographies, and food politics.  The course includes an intensive workshop sponsored by the Tucson Community Food Bank.  In addition to attending that workshop, students are also expected to attend at least one fieldtrip among the two that are organized during the semester as well as attend monthly meetings of the group on the UA campus. Most of the workshop, however, revolves around consistent and engaged involvement with a Tucson school and its teachers and students supporting the development and maintenance of school garden and attendant curriculum.
 

Graduate Classes

GEOG 500 – Research Design (Wilder)

GEOG 579 – Spatial Statistics and Spatial Econometrics (Dall' erba)
This course provides the statistical and econometric techniques required for the analysis of geocoded data. It includes the identification of spatial heterogeneity and inclusion in a formal regression model. An important aspect of the course is to gain hands-on experience in applying the appropriate techniques and using state-of-the-art software.

GEOG 596B - Arizona Water Policy (Megdal)
This course focuses on current Arizona water policy from a multi-disciplinary perspective.  Through readings, research, lectures, discussions and presentations, the student is exposed to major, current water resource issues facing Arizona and other parts of the West and policies to address them.  The faculty draw upon their and guest-lecturers' experiences to demonstrate the development, analysis and implementation of real-world water policy.

GEOG 596M - Making the Connection between Science and Decision Making (Woodhouse)
This seminar explores concepts at the intersection between environmental science and decision making, including scientific information supply and demand, boundary organizations, co-production of knowledge, and knowledge networks, as well the political context for decision making. It also includes practical aspects of two-way communication, exploring the ways in which exchanges take place between scientists and decision makers who can include resource management professionals, planners, policy makers, NGOs, and the general public. It is for both physical and social science students from a broad range of backgrounds.
    
GEOG  658 - Critical Methodological Practice (Del Casino)
A critical theory approach to method (primarily qualitative) in human geography and related social sciences; theoretical derivation of research questions; re-theorization through research findings.

Professional Development Series

GEOG 695B - Professional Development Seminar (Wilder/Woodhouse)

GEOG 695C - Preparing Future Faculty: College Teaching (Tong)
Required to teach an SGD course

Graduate Seminar Series

GEOG 696G – Seminar in Urban Geography (Doshi)

GEOG 696H – Seminar in Political Geography (Waterstone)

GEOG 696N – Seminar in Geography and Social Justice (Jones)

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Fall 2013 Courses

GEOG516A: Computer Cartography (Gary Christopherson)
Introduces the principles of map design, production and analysis.   Graduate-level requirements include an instructor approved 5-8 page paper on a related topic and analytical cartography demonstrating scholarly analysis in contemporary analytical cartography.

GEOG516C: Urban GIS (Paula Decker)
Introduces concepts and application skills for use of geographic information systems to investigate a range of urban spatial issues and decision-making processes.  Emphasis on complete process of GIS-based problem solving, including project planning, spatial data sources/acquisition, preparation/coding, analysis, representation, and communication.  Graduate-level requirements include writing an original research papers based on original data collected in the field.

GEOG538: Biogeography (Wim van Leeuwen)
Biogeography explores past and present distributions of life and its interactions with Earth. In this course we move from Pangea to the Anthropocene, and combine evolutionary and ecological perspectives to show how Earth history and contemporary environments have shaped species distributions and nearly all patterns of biodiversity. Shortly, the interplay between biota and our changing environment through time and space will be pursued and how it relates to species migration, conservation, extinction and climate change. During this course you get to explore and analyze some data and discuss your view of all life on Earth.

GEOG590: Remote Sensing Planet Earth (Wim van Leeuwen)
Remote Sensing for the Study of Planet Earth introduces basic and applied remote sensing science as a means to explore the diversity of our planetary environments (biosphere, atmosphere, lithosphere and hydrosphere) within the radiometric, spectral, spatial, angular and temporal domains of remote sensing systems. This survey course strikes a balance between theory, applications and hands-on labs. We explore how you can download, process, analyze and interpret multi-sensor data and integrate online remotely sensed data sources/products into your research of interest.

GEOG597F: Community & School Garden Workshop (Sallie Marston)
This workshop-based course is designed to enable UA undergraduates and graduates students to work in Tucson-area schools helping students and teachers to undertake the design, construction, planting, harvesting and preparation of foods from a local school garden.  The workshop also involves preparing or assembling curriculum materials to enable teachers and students to teach and learn about food production, food histories and geographies, and food politics.  The course includes an intensive workshop sponsored by the Tucson Community Food Bank.  In addition to attending that workshop, students are also expected to attend at least one fieldtrip among the two that are organized during the semester as well as attend monthly meetings of the group on the UA campus. Most of the workshop, however, revolves around consistent and engaged involvement with a Tucson school and its teachers and students supporting the development and maintenance of school garden and attendant curriculum.

GEOG 689: History of Geographic Thought (Vin Del Casino)
This course explores the terrain of geographic thought and development with a particular emphasis on 20th and 21st century innovations in disciplinary thinking. Students are challenged to take up topics that are both central to their own work and the work of their colleagues, so that  they can situate each other's projects in the historical developments of the discipline. The course is designed to therefore introduce students to the breadth of geographic thinking, from its traditional connection to the physical sciences to its engagements with social theoretical and humanistic thinking. The overall goal, then, is for students to better understand Geography's current pluralistic state as a multi-pronged and multi-theoretical (inter)disciplinary project.

Graduate Seminars

GEOG696B: Cultural Geography (Sallie Marston)

GEOG696H: Political Geography (Diana Liverman)
International Environmental Governance
What are the different approaches to explaining, negotiating and managing the governance of environmental issues such as climate, biodiversity, oceans, and land use?  What are the different roles and powers of governments, international organizations, business, science and NGOs in developing and implementing international environmental policy? This seminar examines the theories, geography and practices of international environmental governance involving multiple scales and actors, critical perspectives, and case studies of key events and agreements.

GEOG696I: Political Ecology (Tracey Osborne)
Engaged Scholarship in Theory and Practice

GEOG696O: Adaptation and Resilience in Water Resources Systems (Christopher Scott)
As we enter an era of drastically heightened pressure on water resources resulting from combined pressures of climate change, urbanization, and agricultural intensification, human societies and ecosystems adapt in unforeseen ways. Decisionmaking by water users, agencies, and global water initiatives must rethink conventional approaches that have assumed bounded, well-understood variability. The new conception of water resource systems – unbounded to allow for multiple future outcomes – seeks to better integrate scientific, engineering, social, and institutional perspectives. It requires new understanding of multiple factors that influence how water is used, how innovation and adaptation arise, and how resilience can be strengthened. Thresholds, system reorganization, multiple equilibria, reliability with uncertainty, and the societal and ecosystem implications of alternative water resource systems will be addressed. This seminar will be based on student-led discussion and will include guest-lecture presentations. Term-paper research on your masters or doctoral topic is encouraged.

 

Professional Development series

GEOG695B: Professional Development (Margaret Wilder)
This course is designed to support graduate students in their current work and as they move towards future careers. It is offered through a series of workshops scheduled approximately once every two weeks (schedule varies to accommodate conferences, SAGA meetings, and other key events). Some sessions are designed for graduate students at any level. Others are specifically addressed to students at different stages in their programs.  Sessions are lead by a variety of different faculty members.  They are interactive and discussion-oriented