Courses

COURSE CATALOG

 

FALL 2015 CLASSES (download pdf)

 

EVS 260 Environmental Studies: Ideas and Institutions
Which ideas, individuals, and institutions have shaped environmental studies and policies in the US and globally?  The course provides an introduction to environmental leaders and writings that have shaped attitudes to the environment, an overview of the most important US and international organizations, agencies and laws that have been established to manage the environment, and the exploration of some pivotal environmental cases, debates and problems.  The course is intended to provide the foundations and environmental literacy for students interested in environment and society and is a core course for the degree in environmental studies.

GEOG 150B1 Human Geography and Global Systems
The human world has never been more interconnected, so now, more than ever, location matters!  This course will show you how global population growth and migration, economic globalization and development, and urbanization trends will impact both your life and the lives of the 7 billion people already on our planet-- not to mention the ca. 3 billion additional people who are expected to inhabit our ecosphere during your lifetime!  (TIER ONE)

GEOG 150C1 Environment and Society
This course introduces students to the study of relationships between people and the environment from a social science perspective, and provides a context for thinking about the social causes and consequences of environmental changes in different parts of the world. It focuses on how and why the human use of the environment has varied over time and space; analyzes different approaches to decision-making about environment issues and examines the relative roles of population growth, energy consumption, technology, culture and institutions in causing and resolving contemporary environmental problems around the world. (TIER ONE)

GEOG 170A1 Earth Environment: Introduction to Physical Geography
Earth’s physical geography derives from dynamic interactions among its four main parts: the atmosphere (air), hydrosphere (water). biosphere (life), and landforms (rocks and soils). We focus in this introductory course on how and why Earth’s physical geography varies over space and time. It is a guided tour of our amazing home! (TIER ONE)

GEOG 205 Places in the Media
This course is an introduction to media and geography. Students will develop critical frames for evaluating how places are represented in media such as television, film, music videos, blogs, and advertisements.  (TIER TWO)

GEOG 210 Political & Cultural Geography
This course examines how systems of difference provide revealing analytical categories for understanding the political and cultural geography of globalization and develops critical thinking skills that can be used effectively beyond this course.

GEOG 222 Working with Numeric, Spatial, and Visual Data: Fundamental Geographic Techniques
This class is designed to furnish students with a basic set of skills in recognizing, locating, processing and analyzing geographic data.  These skills provide a foundation for upper-level classes in statistical methods, Geographic Information Systems, urban and regional development.  These skills also provide a basic professional preparation for employment market requirements including defining research questions, selecting suitable geographic tools and methods to investigate, harvesting and analyzing data, and in presenting findings using computer mapping, spreadsheet, and charting software.

GEOG 230 Our Changing Climate
Where, when, and why is climate changing? We will answer these questions via computer visualization and hands-on exploration of satellite images, time-series, and other climate variability data at global, regional, and local scales, and from paleoclimate to modern instrumental record. (TIER TWO)

GEOG 240 Our Dynamic Landscape
This course addressed critical perspectives on complex environmental problems. Issues include environmental hazards, renewable and nonrenewable resources.  Global, regional, and local patterns, and geographic scale are emphasized. (TIER TWO)

GEOG 250 Environment and Society in the Southwest Borderlands
This course explores the broader trends shaping the US Southwest and Borderlands, with particular emphasis on the region's human-environment tradition. It exposes students to a variety of methods for understanding how humans have organized in the Southwest to gain access to resources critical for their survival, both in the past and in the present context.  Coursework  focuses on the social, cultural, and political dimensions of human-environmental transformation. (TIER TWO)

GEOG 251 World Regions
Survey and comparison of major world regions with a focus on how global processes, regional interconnections, and local geographic conditions create distinctive regions and landscapes. (TIER TWO)

GEOG 302 Introduction to Sustainable Development
More than half of us live in cities but how can we make them more livable from a social equity, economic and environmental standpoint?  This course explores this set of challenges by examining where and how to place and develop new commercial and residential buildings, the protection and addition of green spaces for recreation, urban ecology, what role renewable energy can play, green building design and functions, the advantages of urban agriculture, how to cool cities down, water resource management for arid cities and transportation options for expanding urban areas and diverse populations. (RD CORE)

GEOG 303 Field Study in Environmental Geography
During this course, you will work out of doors (UA campus, with a field trip to the Catalina Mountain) to learn about conducting environmental research. This course is designed to introduce you to various field methods used in environmental geography.  You will learn mapping techniques, use of global positioning systems, weather data collection, land cover data collection, and basic analysis methods for environmental data sets. Get to know your biophysical environment using hands-on tools!

GEOG304  Water, Environment, and Society
This course explores human and natural systems and their dependence on freshwater at multiple scales. Topics of interest include global change, ecosystem services, groundwater, urbanization, land use, watershed and river basin management, stakeholder processes, and water policy.

GEOG 305 Economic Geography
What is the difference between economics and economic geography?  And why does it matter?  You will find out, and a lot more besides, using works of original thinkers such as Von Thuenen, Adam Smith, David Ricardo and Karl Marx.  We apply their insights to questions of location and development, as well as trends such as offshoring and outsourcing, internet adult industry, language learning, industrial restructuring in the US and the former Soviet bloc, and much more. (RD CORE)

GEOG 311A Geography of Mexico
This course provides an overview of the diverse regions, geographies and peoples of Mexico, with particular attention to contemporary processes shaping the socioeconomic, political, environmental and cultural landscape today.

GEOG 330 Introduction to Remote Sensing
Remote sensing is a revolutionary technology that 'images' the whole Earth and empowers students to apply this new scale of knowledge to applications in the physical and social sciences. Lectures and computer labs train students to produce job-relevant aerial photographic and satellite image analyses that address real-world problems.

GEOG 357 Geographic Research Methods
Formulation and solution of geographic problems; models, research design, and methods of gathering, analyzing, and portraying geographic data.

GEOG 367 Population Geography
Fertility, mortality, and migration as agents of demographic change. Topics include fertility control and LDCs; working mothers and NDCs; aging societies; legal/illegal immigration in the U.S., population policies. (RD CORE) (TIER TWO)

GEOG 368 Green Economy
The Green Economy.  What is it and how does it function?  What does it mean for our future?  What are the implications for cities, community, and globalization?  What kind of policies lay the foundation for green economic development, and what challenges and opportunities lie within?  And what does 'green' mean anyway?  This course is a challenging exploration into the day-to-day practices and policies of the green economy, particularly in the United States and the Southwest.  The class will be devoted to understanding how the green economy functions and why, through readings, lectures, visiting speakers, and field studies.

GEOG 371 Principles and Practices of Regional Development  
(counts towards  Urban and Regional Development "Core Courses" requirement)
Meet some of the players who make a difference in how a city builds its economic vibrancy. With Tucson as an example, you'll hear some of the significant and insignificant concerns of those striving to build a stronger, more equitable, more sustainable and dynamic city.

GEOG 373 Political Geography
All politics are embedded in geographical space. The course is designed to explore how we shape, define, and regulate the world through political processes, and in turn, to question how geography and geographical knowledge continue to mediate politics. The course is an intensive survey of political geography, covering the major topics and debates in the discipline. Important themes include nationalism, territory, borders and mobility, conflict and militarism, geopolitics, globalization, human security and intervention.   Through exploring these concepts, the course critically examines the history of geopolitics and other political geographical ideas and perspectives. Contemporary developments in the world’s regions will be selectively drawn upon to illustrate concepts from the course texts and lectures.

GEOG 379 Urban Growth and Development
Location patterns in urban areas and processes of growth; historical development of U.S. cities, rent theory, housing markets, commercial and industrial location, the role of transportation, urban finance, New Urbanist planning and sustainable development concepts.  (RD CORE)

GEOG 407 The American Landscape
This course is an exploration of general theories of landscape and their expression in everyday life. Our primary objective is to understand landscape as sets of practices, ideas, and as a material manifestation of the ways humans interact, both with each other and with the complex world of non-human objects, creatures, and organisms. We will look carefully at how consciousness and being—existence—shape and are shaped by landscape.

GEOG 416E Geovisualization (GIS)
Geovisualization encompasses a range of geospatial and geovisual methods that can be used to elicit and analyze input from stakeholder valuations on built and natural environments and enable better communication with a diverse range of stakeholders.  The class addresses questions such as: What is Geoviz?  Who does it?  How?  And why?  How can GV and participatory geographic information science address social, environmental problems in ways that benefit a broad range of stakeholders?  This class explores geovisualization using ArcGIS, ArcScene, 3D Analyst, SketchUp and GoogleDoc software in conjunction with a range of the latest peer-review literature and project work available online.

GEOG  416F GIS for the Social Sciences
An advanced course for students who want to integrate social science data and geographic information science into their research or work life.  The course is presented in a lecture/laboratory format.  The lecture portion will deal with conceptual issues necessary for the integration of social science data and approaches within a GIS framework.  The laboratory portion will provide practical experience with GIS software products used for the development and analysis of spatially-referenced social science data sets.

GEOG  417 Geographic Information Systems for Natural and Social Sciences
This course introduction to the application of GIS and related technologies for both the natural and social sciences. Conceptual issues in GIS database design and development, analysis, and display.

GEOG 438 Biogeography
Biogeography explores past and present distributions of life and its interactions with Earth. In this course we move from Pangea to the Anthropocene, and combine evolutionary and ecological perspectives to show how Earth history and contemporary environments have shaped species distributions and nearly all patterns of biodiversity. Shortly, the interplay between biota and our changing environment through time and space will be pursued and how it relates to species migration, conservation, extinction and climate change. During this course you get to explore and analyze some data and discuss your view of all life on Earth.

GEOG 444 Entrepreneurial Innovation for Sustainable International Development      
This course examines development-driven social entrepreneurship strategies through which individuals and small groups can have an innovative, scalable impact on sustainable development in the impoverished world (e.g., Sub-Sahara Africa).  Students will address two non-traditional development questions: what is the impact of innovative, development-driven entrepreneurship and how can I collaborate with my peers in the developing world to utilize technology and markets for the betterment of impoverished societies?

GEOG 456 The American City
In this course, an integrated approach to the built environment is taken, with special emphasis on the historical, social, and political aspects of American urban development.

GEOG 457 Statistical Techniques in Geography, Regional Development and Planning
Methods of gathering and analyzing data for the solution of geographical, urban, and regional planning problems, with emphasis on quantitative and statistical techniques used in spatial analysis and cartography, on the one hand, and program planning, on the other.

GEOG 490 Remote Sensing for the Study of Planet Earth
Remote Sensing for the Study of Planet Earth introduces basic and applied remote sensing science as a means to explore the diversity of our planetary environments (biosphere, atmosphere, lithosphere and hydrosphere) within the radiometric, spectral, spatial, angular and temporal domains of remote sensing systems. This survey course strikes a balance between theory, applications and hands-on labs and assignments. We explore how you can download, process, analyze and interpret multi-sensor data and integrate online remotely sensed data sources/products into your research of interest.

GEOG 497F  Community and School Garden Workshop
This workshop-based course is designed to enable UA undergraduates and graduates students to work in Tucson-area schools and community gardens helping students and teachers as well as community members to undertake the design, construction, planting, harvesting and preparation of foods from a garden.  The workshop also involves preparing or assembling curriculum materials to enable teachers and students to teach and learn about food production, food histories and geographies, and food politics.   An intensive garden workshop sponsored by the Tucson Community Food Bank starts the semester.

 

SPRING 2015 CLASSES (download pdf)

EVS 260 - Environmental Studies: Ideas and Institutions
This class analyses the key ideas, individuals, and institutions that have shaped environmental studies and policies in the US and globally.  The course provides an introduction to environmental writings that have shaped attitudes to the environment, an overview of the most important US and international institutions that have been established to manage the environment, and the exploration of critical and iconic environmental cases and problems.  The course is intended to provide the social science foundations and basic environmental literacy for the degree in environmental studies.

EVS 498 - Capstone in Environmental Studies: Environment and the Southwest and Borderlands
A culminating experience for majors involving a substantive project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, including broadly comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and its methodologies. Senior Standing required.

GEOG  150B1 - Human Geography and Global Systems
Social Interactions and Relationships - This course introduces students to fundamental issues and concepts pertinent to the study of individuals and societies. In focusing on models and explanations of how things are interrelated in earth space. Students are given a clearer understanding of the economic, social, and political systems with which individuals live and operate.  (TIER ONE)

GEOG  150C1 - Environment and Society
Societal & Institutional Systems - This course introduces students to the study of relationships between people and the environment from a social science perspective, and provides a context for thinking about the social causes and consequences of environmental changes in different parts of the world. It focuses on how and why the human use of the environment has varied over time and space; analyzes different approaches to decision-making about environment issues and examines the relative roles of population growth, energy consumption, technology, culture and institutions in causing and resolving contemporary environmental problems around the world. (TIER ONE)

GEOG  170A1 - Earth's Environment: Introduction to Physical Geography
The Earth and Its Environments - Introduction to fundamental laws of nature as expressed physical processes that govern the spatial distribution of Earth's land, sea, air, and biological environments. Focus on fluxes and feedbacks among these systems, and interactions with humans. (TIER ONE)

GEOG  200 - Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences
An introductory course in the fundamentals of modern statistics with applications and examples in the social and behavioral sciences. Topics include: methods for describing and summarizing data, probability, random sampling, estimating population parameters, significance tests, contingency tables, simple linear regression, and correlation.

GEOG 210 - Political & Cultural Geography
This course examines how systems of difference provide revealing analytical categories for understanding the political and cultural geography of globalization and develops critical thinking skills that can be used effectively beyond this course.

GEOG 220 - Our Diverse Biosphere
The goals of this course are to (1) immerse non-science majors in the biological aspects of Physical Geography and, through lively discussion, maps, and images, (2) enhance the critical thinking skills that students need to make decisions about the world around them.

GEOG  222 - Working with Numeric, Spatial, and Visual Data: Fundamental Geographic
 This class is designed to furnish students with a basic set of skills in recognizing, locating, processing and analyzing geographic data.  These skills provide a foundation for upper-level classes in statistical methods, Geographic Information Systems, urban and regional development.  These skills also provide a basic professional preparation for employment market requirements including defining research questions, selecting suitable geographic tools and methods to investigate, harvesting and analyzing data, and in presenting findings using computer mapping, spreadsheet, and charting software.

GEOG  251 - World Regions: Comparative and Global Perspectives
This course is a survey and comparison of major world regions with a focus on how global processes, regional interconnections, and local geographic conditions create distinctive regions and landscapes. (TIER TWO)

GEOG 270 Sports Geography
Sports are a central part of landscapes and everyday lives around the world.  They reflect and shape individual and national identities, historical and contemporary global political economies, and the places in which we live.  This class explores these connections, places, and landscapes through the lenses of geography.  Topics include the siting of stadiums and urban development; geographies of identity and nationalism; traditional/indigenous sports; transnational sports and migration; the political economy of megaevents such as the Olympics and World Cup; spaces of race/ethnicity and gender/sexuality; and the landscapes of outdoors sports. (TIER TWO)

GEOG  302 - Introduction to Sustainable Development
More than half of us live in cities but how can we make them more livable from a social equity, economic and environmental standpoint?  This course explores this set of challenges by examining where and how to place and develop new commercial and residential buildings, the protection and addition of green spaces for recreation, urban ecology, what role renewable energy can play, green building design and functions, the advantages of urban agriculture, how to cool cities down, water resource management for arid cities and transportation options for expanding urban areas and diverse populations. (RD CORE)

GEOG 303 - Field Study in Environmental Geography
Study the outdoors! During this course you get to enjoy working in the field (UA campus) and go on a field trip to the Catalina Mountains for instance. This course is designed to introduce you to various methods of conducting and reporting fieldwork, including mapping, collecting and analyzing some environmental data. Get to know your biophysical environment using hands-on tools!

GEOG 304 - Water, Environment, and Society
This course explores human and natural systems and their dependence on freshwater at multiple scales. Topics of interest include global change, ecosystem services, groundwater, urbanization, land use, watershed and river basin management, stakeholder processes, and water policy.

GEOG  305 - Economic Geography
This course covers analysis and modeling of the spatial structure of primary, secondary, and tertiary economic activities; location theory and regionalization in economic systems.  (RD CORE)

GEOG  311D - Geography of Africa
This course provides an overview of the diverse regions, geographies and peoples of Africa, with an emphasis on tropical environmental systems and changing patterns of resource utilization and development.

GEOG 340 - Cultural Geography (honors)
This course will approach the field of cultural geography examining theoretical foundations and practical applications.  It will also focus on the interactive relationships between culture and places, spaces, regions, and landscapes.

GEOG 357 - Geographical Research Methods
This course addresses the formulation and solution of geographic problems; models, research design, and methods of gathering, analyzing, and portraying geographic data.

GEOG 362 - Environment and Development
This course evaluates theories and practices aimed at addressing the complex relationship between economic development and environmental protection in both industrialized and developing world contexts

GEOG  367 - Population Geography
This course is about fertility, mortality, and migration as agents of demographic change. Topics include fertility control and LDCs; working mothers and NDCs; aging societies; legal/illegal immigration in the U.S., population policies. (RD CORE)

GEOG  370 - Geography of International Development
This course concerns the historical evolution of development theory and current debates in geography of international development. Planned micro to macro-level change over space and time examined related to employment, agriculture, food security, environment, migration and the household.

GEOG  371 - Principles and Practices of Regional Development
This course included an introduction to basic concepts, history, objectives, theories and strategies of regional and local economic development professionals. Guest speakers from the community are featured. (RD CORE)

GEOG  373 - Political Geography
This course explores links between global economic and political processes, national affairs and local politics. Designed to foster participation; assessment is via essays and assignments.

GEOG 374 - Geography and Social Justice
This course provides an introduction to theories of social justice with application to social, cultural, and economic geography. What are the prevailing theories of social justice and how can we draw on them to assess movements and goals for social change? How do different geographical contexts inform our assessment of social justice concepts? Course will address theory, moral questions, and specific case studies equally.

GEOG  379 - Urban Growth and Development
Location patterns in urban areas and processes of growth; historical development of U.S. cities, rent theory, housing markets, commercial and industrial location, the role of transportation, urban finance, New Urbanist planning and sustainable development concepts.  (RD CORE)

GEOG  416A  - Computer Cartography
This course introduces the principles of map design, production and analysis.

GEOG  416C - Urban Geographic Information Systems
Introduces concepts and application skills for use of geographic information systems to investigate a range of urban spatial issues and decision-making processes.  Emphasis on complete process of GIS-based problem solving, including project planning, spatial data sources/acquisition, preparation/coding, analysis, representation, and communication.

GEOG  417 - Geographic Information Systems for Natural and Social Sciences
This course introduction to the application of GIS and related technologies for both the natural and social sciences. Conceptual issues in GIS database design and development, analysis, and display.

GEOG  420 - Advanced Geographic Information Systems
This course examines various areas of advanced GIS applications such as dynamic segmentation, surface modeling, spatial statistics, and network modeling. The use of high performance workstations will be emphasized.
   
GEOG  430 - The Climate System
This course is a systematic examination of processes and circulations comprising Earth's climate. The emphasis is on developing an understanding of the basics of the climate system; the earth-sun relationships that drive climate, and the global energy and water balances.  Students will learn about the natural processes that control the climate system and how they interact, and how these interactions translate to climate on the ground in different regions.

GEOG  446 - Health and the Global Economy
This course deals with the interconnection of the global economy, local social structures, and health, as well as examining disease and spatial aspects of health care, including access to care.

GEOG 454 – Regional Analysis
This course provides the theory, techniques and hands-on experience necessary to understand some of the most important questions in urban and real estate economics, namely the spatial distribution of housing prices, the factors driving firms and city dwellers location decisions and the economic cost of congestion. The series of exercises students will work through will help them get familiar with the techniques and a free software (Geoda) commonly used by practitioners in this field. The interdisciplinary nature of the material taught in class is relevant to students majoring in various disciplines such as economics, business, geography, regional development, urban planning and civil engineering.

GEOG  458 - Geography of Transportation
The course presents an overview of the geography of transportation and the relation between transportation and spatial organization. Approaches of description and normative analysis are integrated for understanding the geography of transport.

GEOG  468 - Water and Sustainability
 ‘Sustainability’ is a popular buzzword when we talk about the environment. Yet it is both a complex concept and a challenging goal. What does sustainability mean in the context of water? As economies in the global south develop, how will their increasing water needs be met? How will climate change affect water supply in different global regions?  Could future wars be fought over water or will the future be one of cooperation?  In this class, through readings, films, journals, writing, and discussion, we will examine the myriad ways in which water and society interact, seeking to understand major water issues and proposed solutions in particular regions and across the global landscape.   The course will help students analyze real-world water challenges, understand theoretical approaches to and critiques of sustainability, and develop their critical thinking and writing skills.   
     
GEOG  469 - Water Resource Assessment  (formerly 467)
This course focuses on watersheds, aquifers, and river basins as sources of water to meet human and environmental demands. Techniques covered include watershed delineation, water budget calculation, safe yield estimation, water quality assessment (total maximum daily load). MODSIM, MODFLOW, and WEAP decision support systems are reviewed.

GEOG 471 – Problems in Regional Development
Topical issues in regional development, with emphasis on policy in diverse contexts and case study analysis.

GEOG  483 - Remote Sensing Land Use and Land Cover
Local to global scale land use and land cover are examined using multi spatial and temporal scale remote sensing data. This course will be a mix of lectures and hands-on labs and assignments to access, preprocess, classify and analyze our dynamic world using multispectral and LiDAR airborne and satellite data at weekly, monthly, yearly and decadal time steps. We will focus on problems related to land use and planning, resource management, climate and wildfire impacts and other topics.

GEOG  497F - Community and School Garden Workshop
This workshop-based course is designed to enable UA undergraduates and graduates students to work in Tucson-area schools helping students and teachers to undertake the design, construction, planting, harvesting and preparation of foods from a local school garden.  The workshop also involves preparing or assembling curriculum materials to enable teachers and students to teach and learn about food production, food histories and geographies, and food politics.  The course includes an intensive workshop sponsored by the Tucson Community Food Bank.  In addition to attending that workshop, students are also expected to attend at least one fieldtrip among the two that are organized during the semester as well as attend monthly meetings of the group on the UA campus. Most of the workshop, however, revolves around consistent and engaged involvement with a Tucson school and its teachers and students supporting the development and maintenance of school garden and attendant curriculum.

OTHER COURSES

GEOG  395A - Current Topics in Geography

Exchange of scholarly information and/or primary research through the Department's regularly scheduled Colloquium Series. Student responsibilities include critical reviews of presentations by local and visiting faculty. This course gives students a broad survey of the latest research within the subdisciplines in Geography.  One Credit – Meets Fridays 3:30-4:45pm, most weeks.

Preceptorships, Independent Studies, and Internships (one to six credits)

See also cross-listed courses that are housed in other departments.

 

FALL 2014 CLASSES

 

GEOG 150B1 Human Geography and Global Systems
The human world has never been more interconnected, so now, more than ever, location matters!  This course will show you how global population growth and migration, economic globalization and development, and urbanization trends will impact both your life and the lives of the 7 billion people already on our planet-- not to mention the ca. 3 billion additional people who are expected to inhabit our ecosphere during your lifetime!  (TIER ONE)

GEOG 150C1 Environment and Society
Societal & Institutional Systems. This course introduces students to the study of relationships between people and the environment from a social science perspective, and provides a context for thinking about the social causes and consequences of environmental changes in different parts of the world. It focuses on how and why the human use of the environment has varied over time and space; analyzes different approaches to decision-making about environment issues and examines the relative roles of population growth, energy consumption, technology, culture and institutions in causing and resolving contemporary environmental problems around the world. (TIER ONE)

GEOG 170A1 Earth Environment: Introduction to Physical Geography
Earth’s physical geography derives from dynamic interactions among its four main parts: the atmosphere (air), hydrosphere (water). biosphere (life), and landforms (rocks and soils). We focus in this introductory course on how and why Earth’s physical geography varies over space and time. It is a guided tour of our amazing home! (TIER ONE)

GEOG 205 Places in the Media
This course is an introduction to media and geography. Students will develop critical frames for evaluating how places are represented in media such as television, film, music videos, blogs, and advertisements.  (TIER TWO)

GEOG210 - Political & Cultural (Myadar)
This course examines how systems of difference provide revealing analytical categories for understanding the political and cultural geography of globalization and develops critical thinking skills that can be used effectively beyond this course.

GEOG  230 - Our Changing Climate (TBA)
Where, when, and why is climate changing? We will answer these questions via computer visualization and hands-on exploration of satellite images, time-series, and other climate variability data at global, regional, and local scales, and from paleoclimate to modern instrumental record. (TIER TWO)

GEOG 240 Our Dynamic Landscape
This course addressed critical perspectives on complex environmental problems. Issues include environmental hazards, renewable and nonrenewable resources.  Global, regional, and local patterns, and geographic scale are emphasized. (TIER TWO)

GEOG 251 World Regions
Survey and comparison of major world regions with a focus on how global processes, regional interconnections, and local geographic conditions create distinctive regions and landscapes. (TIER TWO)

EVS 260 Environmental Studies: Ideas and Institutions
Which ideas, individuals, and institutions have shaped environmental studies and policies in the US and globally?  The course provides an introduction to environmental leaders and writings that have shaped attitudes to the environment, an overview of the most important US and international organizations, agencies and laws that have been established to manage the environment, and the exploration of some pivotal environmental cases, debates and problems.  The course is intended to provide the foundations and environmental literacy for students interested in environment and society and is a core course for the degree in environmental studies.

GEOG 270 Sports Geography
Sports are a central part of landscapes and everyday lives around the world.  They reflect and shape individual and national identities, historical and contemporary global political economies, and the places in which we live.  This class explores these connections, places, and landscapes through the lenses of geography.  Topics include the siting of stadiums and urban development; geographies of identity and nationalism; traditional/indigenous sports; transnational sports and migration; the political economy of megaevents such as the Olympics and World Cup; spaces of race/ethnicity and gender/sexuality; and the landscapes of outdoors sports. (TIER TWO)

GEOG 302 Introduction to Sustainable Development
More than half of us live in cities but how can we make them more livable from a social equity, economic and environmental standpoint?  This course explores this set of challenges by examining where and how to place and develop new commercial and residential buildings, the protection and addition of green spaces for recreation, urban ecology, what role renewable energy can play, green building design and functions, the advantages of urban agriculture, how to cool cities down, water resource management for arid cities and transportation options for expanding urban areas and diverse populations. (RD CORE)

GEOG 303 Field Study in Environmental Geography
During this course, you will work out of doors (UA campus, with a field trip to the Catalina Mountain) to learn about conducting environmental research. This course is designed to introduce you to various field methods used in environmental geography.  You will learn mapping techniques, use of global positioning systems, weather data collection, land cover data collection, and basic analysis methods for environmental data sets. Get to know your biophysical environment using hands-on tools!

GEOG304 - Water, Environment, and Society
This course explores human and natural systems and their dependence on freshwater at multiple scales. Topics of interest include global change, ecosystem services, groundwater, urbanization, land use, watershed and river basin management, stakeholder processes, and water policy.

GEOG 305 Economic Geography
What is the difference between economics and economic geography?  And why does it matter?  You will find out, and a lot more besides, using works of original thinkers such as Von Thuenen, Adam Smith, David Ricardo and Karl Marx.  We apply their insights to questions of location and development, as well as trends such as offshoring and outsourcing, internet adult industry, language learning, industrial restructuring in the US and the former Soviet bloc, and much more. (RD CORE)

Geography 311B Central America and the Caribbean
This course offers a broad examination of the societies, economies, and politics of Central America and the Caribbean. Major themes include colonialism, race and national identity, development, revolution and counterrevolution, globalization and migration. The course offers a comparative analysis of the social history and economic development of the region. Through in-depth case studies, we will analyze the history and impact of U.S. policy in the region, processes of modernization and dependent development, the roots and experiences of revolutionary movements in the region and the characteristics and consequences of political violence. In-depth case studies will include Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Guatemala. The final section of the course deals with contemporary processes of social change in Central America and the Caribbean, including globalization, economic change, political transition, new social movements, and migration and diasporic communities.

GEOG 330 Introduction to Remote Sensing
Remote sensing is a revolutionary technology that 'images' the whole Earth and empowers students to apply this new scale of knowledge to applications in the physical and social sciences. Lectures and computer labs train students to produce job-relevant aerial photographic and satellite image analyses that address real-world problems.

GEOG 357 Geographic Research Methods
Formulation and solution of geographic problems; models, research design, and methods of gathering, analyzing, and portraying geographic data.

GEOG 367 Population Geography
Fertility, mortality, and migration as agents of demographic change. Topics include fertility control and LDCs; working mothers and NDCs; aging societies; legal/illegal immigration in the U.S., population policies. (RD CORE) (TIER TWO)

GEOG 368 Green Economy
The Green Economy.  What is it and how does it function?  What does it mean for our future?  What are the implications for cities, community, and globalization?  What kind of policies lay the foundation for green economic development, and what challenges and opportunities lie within?  And what does 'green' mean anyway?  This course is a challenging exploration into the day-to-day practices and policies of the green economy, particularly in the United States and the Southwest.  The class will be devoted to understanding how the green economy functions and why, through readings, lectures, visiting speakers, and field studies.

GEOG 371 Principles and Practices of Regional Development  
(counts towards  Urban and Regional Development "Core Courses" requirement)
Meet some of the players who make a difference in how a city builds its economic vibrancy. With Tucson as an example, you'll hear some of the significant and insignificant concerns of those striving to build a stronger, more equitable, more sustainable and dynamic city.

GEOG 373 Political Geography
All politics are embedded in geographical space. The course is designed to explore how we shape, define, and regulate the world through political processes, and in turn, to question how geography and geographical knowledge continue to mediate politics. The course is an intensive survey of political geography, covering the major topics and debates in the discipline. Important themes include nationalism, territory, borders and mobility, conflict and militarism, geopolitics, globalization, human security and intervention.   Through exploring these concepts, the course critically examines the history of geopolitics and other political geographical ideas and perspectives. Contemporary developments in the world’s regions will be selectively drawn upon to illustrate concepts from the course texts and lectures.

GEOG 379 Urban Growth and Development
Location patterns in urban areas and processes of growth; historical development of U.S. cities, rent theory, housing markets, commercial and industrial location, the role of transportation, urban finance, New Urbanist planning and sustainable development concepts.  (RD CORE)

GEOG 407 The American Landscape
This course is an exploration of general theories of landscape and their expression in everyday life. Our primary objective is to understand landscape as sets of practices, ideas, and as a material manifestation of the ways humans interact, both with each other and with the complex world of non-human objects, creatures,and organisms. We will look carefully at how consciousness and being—existence—shape and are shaped by landscape.

GEOG  416F - GIS for the Social Sciences
An advanced course for students who want to integrate social science data and geographic information science into their research or work life.  The course is presented in a lecture/laboratory format.  The lecture portion will deal with conceptual issues necessary for the integration of social science data and approaches within a GIS framework.  The laboratory portion will provide practical experience with GIS software products used for the development and analysis of spatially-referenced social science data sets.

GEOG  417 - Geographic Information Systems for Natural and Social Sciences
This course introduction to the application of GIS and related technologies for both the natural and social sciences. Conceptual issues in GIS database design and development, analysis, and display.

GEOG438 Biogeography
Biogeography explores past and present distributions of life and its interactions with Earth. In this course we move from Pangea to the Anthropocene, and combine evolutionary and ecological perspectives to show how Earth history and contemporary environments have shaped species distributions and nearly all patterns of biodiversity. Shortly, the interplay between biota and our changing environment through time and space will be pursued and how it relates to species migration, conservation, extinction and climate change. During this course you get to explore and analyze some data and discuss your view of all life on Earth.

GEOG 456 The American City
In this course, an integrated approach to the built environment is taken, with special emphasis on the historical, social, and political aspects of American urban development.

GEOG 457 Statistical Techniques in Geography, Regional Development and Planning
Methods of gathering and analyzing data for the solution of geographical, urban, and regional planning problems, with emphasis on quantitative and statistical techniques used in spatial analysis and cartography, on the one hand, and program planning, on the other.

GEOG 463  Economic and Environmental Input-Output Analysis
This course provides the theory, techniques and hands-on experience necessary to understand input-output and its applications to a set of economic and environmental issues. Input-output has the capacity to measure linkages and the propagation of an economic or environmental shock across sectors and regions of an economy. It is commonly used for transportation planning, disaster relief, energy forecasting, environmental analysis (pollution attribution), social accounting models, and quantifying the impact of a terrorist attack. An important aspect of the course is to gain hands-on experience by applying the appropriate techniques and perform impact analysis with Microsoft Excel and PyIO (Python Input-Output).

GEOG 497F  Community and School Garden Workshop
This workshop-based course is designed to enable UA undergraduates and graduates students to work in Tucson-area schools and community gardens helping students and teachers as well as community members to undertake the design, construction, planting, harvesting and preparation of foods from a garden.  The workshop also involves preparing or assembling curriculum materials to enable teachers and students to teach and learn about food production, food histories and geographies, and food politics.   An intensive garden workshop sponsored by the Tucson Community Food Bank starts the semester.

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SPRING 2014 CLASSES (download pdf)

 

EVS 260 - Environmental Studies: Ideas and Institutions (Greene)
This class analyses the key ideas, individuals, and institutions that have shaped environmental studies and policies in the US and globally.  The course provides an introduction to environmental writings that have shaped attitudes to the environment, an overview of the most important US and international institutions that have been established to manage the environment, and the exploration of critical and iconic environmental cases and problems.  The course is intended to provide the social science foundations and basic environmental literacy for the degree in environmental studies.

GEOG  150B1 - Human Geography and Global Systems (Plane/Bishop)
Social Interactions and Relationships - This course introduces students to fundamental issues and concepts pertinent to the study of individuals and societies. In focusing on models and explanations of how things are interrelated in earth space. Students are given a clearer understanding of the economic, social, and political systems with which individuals live and operate.  (TIER ONE)

GEOG  150C1 - Environment and Society (Osborne)
Societal & Institutional Systems - This course introduces students to the study of relationships between people and the environment from a social science perspective, and provides a context for thinking about the social causes and consequences of environmental changes in different parts of the world. It focuses on how and why the human use of the environment has varied over time and space; analyzes different approaches to decision-making about environment issues and examines the relative roles of population growth, energy consumption, technology, culture and institutions in causing and resolving contemporary environmental problems around the world. (TIER ONE)

GEOG  170A1 - Earth's Environment: Introduction to Physical Geography (Decker)
The Earth and Its Environments - Introduction to fundamental laws of nature as expressed physical processes that govern the spatial distribution of Earth's land, sea, air, and biological environments. Focus on fluxes and feedbacks among these systems, and interactions with humans. (TIER ONE)

GEOG  200 - Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences
An introductory course in the fundamentals of modern statistics with applications and examples in the social and behavioral sciences. Topics include: methods for describing and summarizing data, probability, random sampling, estimating population parameters, significance tests, contingency tables, simple linear regression, and correlation.

GEOG  205 - Places in the Media (Miller)
This course is an introduction to media and geography. Students will develop critical frames for evaluating how places are represented in media such as television, film, music videos, blogs, and advertisements.  (TIER TWO)

GEOG210 - Political & Cultural (Myadar)
This course examines how systems of difference provide revealing analytical categories for understanding the political and cultural geography of globalization and develops critical thinking skills that can be used effectively beyond this course.

GEOG220 - Our Diverse Biosphere (Barron-Gafford)
The goals of this course are to (1) immerse non-science majors in the biological aspects of Physical Geography and, through lively discussion, maps, and images, (2) enhance the critical thinking skills that students need to make decisions about the world around them.

GEOG  230 - Our Changing Climate (TBA)
Where, when, and why is climate changing? We will answer these questions via computer visualization and hands-on exploration of satellite images, time-series, and other climate variability data at global, regional, and local scales, and from paleoclimate to modern instrumental record. (TIER TWO)

GEOG  250 - Environment and Society in the Southwest Borderlands (Cash)
This course explores the broader trends shaping the US Southwest and Borderlands, with particular emphasis on the region's human-environment tradition. It exposes students to a variety of methods for understanding how humans have organized in the Southwest to gain access to resources critical for their survival, both in the past and in the present context.  Geog 250, likewise, focuses on the social, cultural, and political dimensions of human-environmental transformation. (TIER TWO)

GEOG  251 - World Regions: Comparative and Global Perspectives (TBA)
This course is a survey and comparison of major world regions with a focus on how global processes, regional interconnections, and local geographic conditions create distinctive regions and landscapes. (TIER TWO)

GEOG303 - Field Study in Enviromental Geography (Guiterman)
Study the outdoors! During this course you get to enjoy working in the field (UA campus) and go on a field trip to the Catalina Mountains for instance. This course is designed to introduce you to various methods of conducting and reporting fieldwork, including mapping, collecting and analyzing some environmental data. Get to know your biophysical environment using hands-on tools!

GEOG304 - Water, Environment, and Society (Scott)
This course explores human and natural systems and their dependence on freshwater at multiple scales. Topics of interest include global change, ecosystem services, groundwater, urbanization, land use, watershed and river basin management, stakeholder processes, and water policy.

GEOG  305 - Economic Geography (Kear)
This course covers analysis and modeling of the spatial structure of primary, secondary, and tertiary economic activities; location theory and regionalization in economic systems.  (RD CORE)

GEOG  311A - Geography of Mexico (TBA)
This course provides an overview of the diverse regions, geographies and peoples of Mexico, with particular attention to contemporary processes shaping the socioeconomic, political, environmental and cultural landscape today.

GEOG 312 - Native American Geography (McCormack)    
This course looks at environment and human relationships on the North American continent with an emphasis on Native nations and indigenous perspectives. Major topics include sacred spaces, colonialism, politics and law, race and power, cultural landscapes, governance and self-determination.

GEOG 340 - Cultural Geography (TBA)
This course will approach the field of cultural geography examining theoretical foundations and practical applications.  It will also focus on the interactive relationships between culture and places, spaces, regions, and landscapes.

GEOG 357 - Geographical Research Methods (Rushbrook)
This course addresses the formulation and solution of geographic problems; models, research design, and methods of gathering, analyzing, and portraying geographic data.

GEOG 362 - Environment and Development (Osborne)
This course evaluates theories and practices aimed at addressing the complex relationship between economic development and environmental protection in both industrialized and developing world contexts

GEOG  367 - Population Geography (Rushbrook)
This course is about fertility, mortality, and migration as agents of demographic change. Topics include fertility control and LDCs; working mothers and NDCs; aging societies; legal/illegal immigration in the U.S., population policies. (RD CORE)

GEOG  370 - Geography of International Development (Wilder)
This course concerns the historical evolution of development theory and current debates in geography of international development. Planned micro to macro-level change over space and time examined related to employment, agriculture, food security, environment, migration and the household.

GEOG  371 - Principles and Practices of Regional Development (Dobbyn)
This course included an introduction to basic concepts, history, objectives, theories and strategies of regional and local economic development professionals. Guest speakers from the community are featured. (RD CORE)

GEOG 372 - Geography & Gender (Doshi)
This introductory course outlines key theories concerning the social and spatial construction of gender difference. Students will explore how gender dynamics play out in  lived and imagined spaces such as the workplace, home, city, nature, and nation.
Special attention is given to how everyday practices and transnational flows of people, ideas, and resources are influenced by and shape gender in connection with class, race, sexuality, and other relations of power and difference.

GEOG  373 - Political Geography (Myadar)
This course explores links between global economic and political processes, national affairs and local politics. Designed to foster participation; assessment is via essays and assignments.

GEOG 374 - Geography and Social Justice (Waterstone)
This course provides an introduction to theories of social justice with application to social, cultural, and economic geography. What are the prevailing theories of social justice and how can we draw on them to assess movements and goals for social change? How do different geographical contexts inform our assessment of social justice concepts? Course will address theory, moral questions, and specific case studies equally.

GEOG 375 - Metro Tucson (Samuels)
This course covers the physical and cultural basis of Tucson's geographic patterns, with emphasis on the city's site, situation, settlement patterns and problems of growth and change.

GEOG 378 Honors, Global Human Rights (Oglesby)
This course will explore the meanings of human rights in different historical contexts, as well as analyze ongoing contemporary conflicts over the universality of human rights.  Our analytical lens will include political philosophers, nation-states and international organizations, but we will also pursue alternative visions and voices, exploring how human rights debates in the "West" were shaped by an uneasy tension with colonialism and slavery. The course explores the role of major governmental and non-governmental institutions in human rights activism, and analyzes emerging approaches to transnational geographies of justice. We will explore the ongoing contested boundaries of universal human rights protection, including gender and human rights; the collective rights of indigenous peoples; prisoners of war; and the rights of non-citizens within a global human rights regime still largely scripted by the dictates of national sovereignty.

GEOG  379 - Urban Growth and Development (Plane)
Location patterns in urban areas and processes of growth; historical development of U.S. cities, rent theory, housing markets, commercial and industrial location, the role of transportation, urban finance, New Urbanist planning and sustainable development concepts.  (RD CORE)

GEOG  416A  - Computer Cartography (Christopherson)
This course introduces the principles of map design, production and analysis.

GEOG  416E – Geovisualization (Bailey)
This course introduces principles and practices of Geovisualization (Geoviz) and softwares (Community and ERDAS Image).
.
GEOG  417 - Geographic Information Systems for Natural and Social Sciences (Christopherson)
This course introduction to the application of GIS and related technologies for both the natural and social sciences. Conceptual issues in GIS database design and development, analysis, and display.

GEOG  420 - Advanced Geographic Information Systems (Christopherson)
This course examines various areas of advanced GIS applications such as dynamic segmentation, surface modeling, spatial statistics, and network modeling. The use of high performance workstations will be emphasized.
   
GEOG  430 - The Climate System (Glueck)
This course is a systematic examination of processes and circulations comprising Earth's climate. The emphasis is on developing an understanding of the basics of the climate system; the earth-sun relationships that drive climate, and the global energy and water balances.  Students will learn about the natural processes that control the climate system and how they interact, and how these interactions translate to climate on the ground in different regions.

GEOG  446 - Health and the Global Economy (Bishop)
This course deals with the interconnection of the global economy, local social structures, and health, as well as examining disease and spatial aspects of health care, including access to care.

GEOG 454 – Regional Analysis (Dall’erba)
This course provides the theory, techniques and hands-on experience necessary to understand some of the most important questions in urban and real estate economics, namely the spatial distribution of housing prices, the factors driving firms and city dwellers location decisions and the economic cost of congestion. The series of exercises students will work through will help them get familiar with the techniques and a free software (Geoda) commonly used by practitioners in this field. The interdisciplinary nature of the material taught in class is relevant to students majoring in various disciplines such as economics, business, geography, regional development, urban planning and civil engineering.

GEOG  458 - Geography of Transportation (Tong)
The course presents an overview of the geography of transportation and the relation between transportation and spatial organization. Approaches of description and normative analysis are integrated for understanding the geography of transport.

GEOG 471 – Problems in Regional Development (Bailey)
Topical issues in regional development, with emphasis on policy in diverse contexts and case study analysis.

GEOG 472 - Exploring Radical Geography (Waterstone)
This course is an tntroduction to origins and continuing development of radical geography and its concerns with capitalism, nature, culture, class, gender, race, and ethnicity.

GEOG  483 - Remote Sensing Land Use and Land Cover  (van Leeuwen)
Local to global scale land use and land cover are examined using multi spatial and temporal scale remote sensing data. This course will be a mix of lectures and hands-on labs and assignments to access, preprocess, classify and analyze our dynamic world using multispectral and LiDAR airborne and satellite data at weekly, monthly, yearly and decadal time steps. We will focus on problems related to land use and planning, resource management, climate and wildfire impacts and other topics.

GEOG  497F - Community and School Garden Workshop (Marston)
This workshop-based course is designed to enable UA undergraduates and graduates students to work in Tucson-area schools helping students and teachers to undertake the design, construction, planting, harvesting and preparation of foods from a local school garden.  The workshop also involves preparing or assembling curriculum materials to enable teachers and students to teach and learn about food production, food histories and geographies, and food politics.  The course includes an intensive workshop sponsored by the Tucson Community Food Bank.  In addition to attending that workshop, students are also expected to attend at least one fieldtrip among the two that are organized during the semester as well as attend monthly meetings of the group on the UA campus. Most of the workshop, however, revolves around consistent and engaged involvement with a Tucson school and its teachers and students supporting the development and maintenance of school garden and attendant curriculum.

OTHER COURSES

GEOG  395A - Current Topics in Geography

Exchange of scholarly information and/or primary research through the Department's regularly scheduled Colloquium Series. Student responsibilities include critical reviews of presentations by local and visiting faculty. This course gives students a broad survey of the latest research within the subdisciplines in Geography.  One Credit – Meets Fridays 3:30-4:45pm, most weeks.

Preceptorships, Independent Studies, and Internships (one to six credits)

See also cross-listed courses that are housed in other departments.
 

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FALL 2013 CLASSES

GEOG 150B1 Human Geography and Global Systems
The human world has never been more interconnected, so now, more than ever, location matters!  This course will show you how global population growth and migration, economic globalization and development, and urbanization trends will impact both your life and the lives of the 7 billion people already on our planet-- not to mention the ca. 3 billion additional people who are expected to inhabit our ecosphere during your lifetime!  (TIER ONE)

GEOG 150C1 Environment and Society
Societal & Institutional Systems. This course introduces students to the study of relationships between people and the environment from a social science perspective, and provides a context for thinking about the social causes and consequences of environmental changes in different parts of the world. It focuses on how and why the human use of the environment has varied over time and space; analyzes different approaches to decision-making about environment issues and examines the relative roles of population growth, energy consumption, technology, culture and institutions in causing and resolving contemporary environmental problems around the world. (TIER ONE)

GEOG 170A1 Earth Environment: Introduction to Physical Geography
Earth’s physical geography derives from dynamic interactions among its four main parts: the atmosphere (air), hydrosphere (water). biosphere (life), and landforms (rocks and soils). We focus in this introductory course on how and why Earth’s physical geography varies over space and time. It is a guided tour of our amazing home! (TIER ONE)

GEOG 205 Places in the Media
This course is an introduction to media and geography. Students will develop critical frames for evaluating how places are represented in media such as television, film, music videos, blogs, and advertisements.  (TIER TWO)

GEOG 220 Our Diverse Biosphere
Earth's biosphere brims with life. Together we will taste Earth's living history and observe the rules of science that make our home planet habitable. Students will come to understand the complex forces driving the rise and demise of plants and animals through space and across time, speculating about open questions concerning the sustainability of planetary biodiversity. (TIER TWO)

GEOG 240 Our Dynamic Landscape
This course addressed critical perspectives on complex environmental problems. Issues include environmental hazards, renewable and nonrenewable resources.  Global, regional, and local patterns, and geographic scale are emphasized. (TIER TWO)

EVS 260 Environmental Studies: Ideas and Institutions
Which ideas, individuals, and institutions have shaped environmental studies and policies in the US and globally?  The course provides an introduction to environmental leaders and writings that have shaped attitudes to the environment, an overview of the most important US and international organizations, agencies and laws that have been established to manage the environment, and the exploration of some pivotal environmental cases, debates and problems.  The course is intended to provide the foundations and environmental literacy for students interested in environment and society and is a core course for the degree in environmental studies.

GEOG 251 World Regions
Survey and comparison of major world regions with a focus on how global processes, regional interconnections, and local geographic conditions create distinctive regions and landscapes. (TIER TWO)

GEOG 270 Sports Geography
Sports are a central part of landscapes and everyday lives around the world.  They reflect and shape individual and national identities, historical and contemporary global political economies, and the places in which we live.  This class explores these connections, places, and landscapes through the lenses of geography.  Topics include the siting of stadiums and urban development; geographies of identity and nationalism; traditional/indigenous sports; transnational sports and migration; the political economy of megaevents such as the Olympics and World Cup; spaces of race/ethnicity and gender/sexuality; and the landscapes of outdoors sports. (TIER TWO)

GEOG 302 Introduction to Sustainable Development
More than half of us live in cities but how can we make them more livable from a social equity, economic and environmental standpoint?  This course explores this set of challenges by examining where and how to place and develop new commercial and residential buildings, the protection and addition of green spaces for recreation, urban ecology, what role renewable energy can play, green building design and functions, the advantages of urban agriculture, how to cool cities down, water resource management for arid cities and transportation options for expanding urban areas and diverse populations. (RD CORE)

GEOG 303 Field Study in Environmental Geography
During this course, you will work out of doors (UA campus, with a field trip to the Catalina Mountain) to learn about conducting environmental research. This course is designed to introduce you to various field methods used in environmental geography.  You will learn mapping techniques, use of global positioning systems, weather data collection, land cover data collection, and basic analysis methods for environmental data sets. Get to know your biophysical environment using hands-on tools!

GEOG 305 Economic Geography
What is the difference between economics and economic geography?  And why does it matter?  You will find out, and a lot more besides, using works of original thinkers such as Von Thuenen, Adam Smith, David Ricardo and Karl Marx.  We apply their insights to questions of location and development, as well as trends such as offshoring and outsourcing, internet adult industry, language learning, industrial restructuring in the US and the former Soviet bloc, and much more. (RD CORE)

Geography 311B Central America and the Caribbean
This course offers a broad examination of the societies, economies, and politics of Central America and the Caribbean. Major themes include colonialism, race and national identity, development, revolution and counterrevolution, globalization and migration. The course offers a comparative analysis of the social history and economic development of the region. Through in-depth case studies, we will analyze the history and impact of U.S. policy in the region, processes of modernization and dependent development, the roots and experiences of revolutionary movements in the region and the characteristics and consequences of political violence. In-depth case studies will include Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Guatemala. The final section of the course deals with contemporary processes of social change in Central America and the Caribbean, including globalization, economic change, political transition, new social movements, and migration and diasporic communities.

GEOG 311D Geography of Africa
Overview of Africa including physical, human and environmental geography.  Focus on the historical processes which lead to the contemporary geography of the continent, as well as current development and environmental issues.

GEOG 311E Geography of the Middle East
This course covers the physical environments and cultural areas of Southwest Asia, with emphasis on people-environment interrelationships, settlement systems, and impact of Islam.

GEOG 330 Introduction to Remote Sensing
Remote sensing is a revolutionary technology that 'images' the whole Earth and empowers students to apply this new scale of knowledge to applications in the physical and social sciences. Lectures and computer labs train students to produce job-relevant aerial photographic and satellite image analyses that address real-world problems.

GEOG 357 Geographic Research Methods
Formulation and solution of geographic problems; models, research design, and methods of gathering, analyzing, and portraying geographic data.

GEOG 367 Population Geography
Fertility, mortality, and migration as agents of demographic change. Topics include fertility control and LDCs; working mothers and NDCs; aging societies; legal/illegal immigration in the U.S., population policies. (RD CORE) (TIER TWO)

GEOG 368 Green Economy
The Green Economy.  What is it and how does it function?  What does it mean for our future?  What are the implications for cities, community, and globalization?  What kind of policies lay the foundation for green economic development, and what challenges and opportunities lie within?  And what does 'green' mean anyway?  This course is a challenging exploration into the day-to-day practices and policies of the green economy, particularly in the United States and the Southwest.  The class will be devoted to understanding how the green economy functions and why, through readings, lectures, visiting speakers, and field studies.

GEOG 371 Principles and Practices of Regional Development  
(counts towards  Urban and Regional Development "Core Courses" requirement)
Meet some of the players who make a difference in how a city builds its economic vibrancy. With Tucson as an example, you'll hear some of the significant and insignificant concerns of those striving to build a stronger, more equitable, more sustainable and dynamic city.

GEOG 373 Political Geography
All politics are embedded in geographical space. The course is designed to explore how we shape, define, and regulate the world through political processes, and in turn, to question how geography and geographical knowledge continue to mediate politics. The course is an intensive survey of political geography, covering the major topics and debates in the discipline. Important themes include nationalism, territory, borders and mobility, conflict and militarism, geopolitics, globalization, human security and intervention.   Through exploring these concepts, the course critically examines the history of geopolitics and other political geographical ideas and perspectives. Contemporary developments in the world’s regions will be selectively drawn upon to illustrate concepts from the course texts and lectures.

GEOG 379 Urban Growth and Development
Location patterns in urban areas and processes of growth; historical development of U.S. cities, rent theory, housing markets, commercial and industrial location, the role of transportation, urban finance, New Urbanist planning and sustainable development concepts.  (RD CORE)

Geography 378 Global Human Rights
This course will explore the meanings of human rights in different historical contexts, as well as analyze ongoing contemporary conflicts over the universality of human rights.  Our analytical lens will include political philosophers, nation-states and international organizations, but we will also pursue alternative visions and voices, exploring how human rights debates in the "West" were shaped by an uneasy tension with colonialism and slavery. The course explores the role of major governmental and non-governmental institutions in human rights activism, and analyzes emerging approaches to transnational geographies of justice. We will explore the ongoing contested boundaries of universal human rights protection, including gender and human rights; the collective rights of indigenous peoples; prisoners of war; and the rights of non-citizens within a global human rights regime still largely scripted by the dictates of national sovereignty.

GEOG 407 The American Landscape
This course is an exploration of general theories of landscape and their expression in everyday life. Our primary objective is to understand landscape as sets of practices, ideas, and as a material manifestation of the ways humans interact, both with each other and with the complex world of non-human objects, creatures,and organisms. We will look carefully at how consciousness and being—existence—shape and are shaped by landscape.

GEOG 416A Computer Cartography
This course introduced the principles of map design, production, and analysis.

GEOG438 Biogeography
Biogeography explores past and present distributions of life and its interactions with Earth. In this course we move from Pangea to the Anthropocene, and combine evolutionary and ecological perspectives to show how Earth history and contemporary environments have shaped species distributions and nearly all patterns of biodiversity. Shortly, the interplay between biota and our changing environment through time and space will be pursued and how it relates to species migration, conservation, extinction and climate change. During this course you get to explore and analyze some data and discuss your view of all life on Earth.

GEOG 453 Locational Analysis
This course focuses on the theories and basic techniques used to analyze the location choices of industries and households -- and how those techniques can be used to solve real world problems. The type of questions we will ask include: how does an individual firm choose its location place and how different is it for a group of firms or activities? How is the urban land divided between firms and households? How can urban problems such as congestion and pollution be treated? Where should new retail stores decide to locate?  A series of exercises  will  help you understand the applications and limitations of locational analysis.  

GEOG 455 Advanced Regional Study
This fall, the course focuses on the vibrant societies of East Asia- China, Korea, Japan and Mongolia- with a particular emphasis on the political and cultural geography of the region.   Rather than lumping the regional countries as a monolithic oriental space, the course examines the complexities of the political and cultural landscapes of this vast and complex region.  Through surveying important themes including nationalism, territoriality, power, religion, identity, and gender, the course will provide in depth understandings of how geographies of identification and difference are constructed, contested, and renegotiated in these regional countries.  

GEOG 456 The American City
In this course, an integrated approach to the built environment is taken, with special emphasis on the historical, social, and political aspects of American urban development.

GEOG 468 Water and Sustainability
 ‘Sustainability’ is a popular buzzword when we talk about the environment. Yet it is both a complex concept and a challenging goal. What does sustainability mean in the context of water? As economies in the global south develop, how will their increasing water needs be met? How will climate change affect water supply in different global regions?  Could future wars be fought over water or will the future be one of cooperation?  In this class, through readings, films, journals, writing, and discussion, we will examine the myriad ways in which water and society interact, seeking to understand major water issues and proposed solutions in particular regions and across the global landscape.   The course will help students analyze real-world water challenges, understand theoretical approaches to and critiques of sustainability, and develop their critical thinking and writing skills.   

GEOG 497F  Community and School Garden Workshop
This workshop-based course is designed to enable UA undergraduates and graduates students to work in Tucson-area schools and community gardens helping students and teachers as well as community members to undertake the design, construction, planting, harvesting and preparation of foods from a garden.  The workshop also involves preparing or assembling curriculum materials to enable teachers and students to teach and learn about food production, food histories and geographies, and food politics.   An intensive garden workshop sponsored by the Tucson Community Food Bank starts the semester. 
 


SPRING 2013 CLASSES

Undergraduate courses

GEOG  150B1 - Human Geography and Global Systems
Social Interactions and Relationships - This course introduces students to fundamental issues and concepts pertinent to the study of individuals and societies. In focusing on models and explanations of how things are interrelated in earth space. Students are given a clearer understanding of the economic, social, and political systems with which individuals live and operate.  (TIER ONE)

GEOG  150C1 - Environment and Society
Societal & Institutional Systems - This course introduces students to the study of relationships between people and the environment from a social science perspective, and provides a context for thinking about the social causes and consequences of environmental changes in different parts of the world. It focuses on how and why the human use of the environment has varied over time and space; analyzes different approaches to decision-making about environment issues and examines the relative roles of population growth, energy consumption, technology, culture and institutions in causing and resolving contemporary environmental problems around the world. (TIER ONE)

GEOG  170A1 - Earth's Environment: Introduction to Physical Geography
The Earth and Its Environments - Introduction to fundamental laws of nature as expressed physical processes that govern the spatial distribution of Earth's land, sea, air, and biological environments. Focus on fluxes and feedbacks among these systems, and interactions with humans. (TIER ONE)

GEOG  200 - Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences
An introductory course in the fundamentals of modern statistics with applications and examples in the social and behavioral sciences. Topics include: methods for describing and summarizing data, probability, random sampling, estimating population parameters, significance tests, contingency tables, simple linear regression, and correlation.

GEOG  205 - Places in the Media
This course is an introduction to media and geography. Students will develop critical frames for evaluating how places are represented in media such as television, film, music videos, blogs, and advertisements.  (TIER TWO)

GEOG  230 - Our Changing Climate
Where, when, and why is climate changing? We will answer these questions via computer visualization and hands-on exploration of satellite images, time-series, and other climate variability data at global, regional, and local scales, and from paleoclimate to modern instrumental record. (TIER TWO)

GEOG  250 - Environment and Society in the Southwest Borderlands
A Tier Two, Individuals and Societies courseexplores the broader trends shaping the US Southwest and Borderlands, with particular emphasis on the region's human-environment tradition. It exposes students to a variety of methods for understanding how humans have organized in the Southwest to gain access to resources critical for their survival, both in the past and in the present context.  Geog 250, likewise, focuses on the social, cultural, and political dimensions of human-environmental transformation. (TIER TWO)

GEOG  251 - World Regions: Comparative and Global Perspectives
Survey and comparison of major world regions with a focus on how global processes, regional interconnections, and local geographic conditions create distinctive regions and landscapes. (TIER TWO)

GEOG  302 - Introduction to Sustainable Development
Introduction to Sustainable Development is a foundational course in understanding the policies and strategies that constitute "smart" regional development in US metropolitan areas.  (RD CORE)

GEOG  305 - Economic Geography
Analysis and modeling of the spatial structure of primary, secondary, and tertiary economic activities; location theory and regionalization in economic systems.  (RD CORE)

GEOG  311A - Geography of Mexico
Provides an overview of the diverse regions, geographies and peoples of Mexico, with particular attention to contemporary processes shaping the socioeconomic, political, environmental and cultural landscape today.

GEOG  357 - Geographical Research Methods
Formulation and solution of geographic problems; models, research design, and methods of gathering, analyzing, and portraying geographic data.

GEOG  367 - Population Geography
Fertility, mortality, and migration as agents of demographic change. Topics include fertility control and LDCs; working mothers and NDCs; aging societies; legal/illegal immigration in the U.S., population policies. (RD CORE)

GEOG  370 - Geography of International Development
Historical evolution of development theory and current debates in geography of international development. Planned micro to macro-level change over space and time examined related to employment, agriculture, food security, environment, migration and the household.

GEOG  371 - Principles and Practices of Regional Development
Introduction to basic concepts, objectives, practices and techniques of regional and industrial development as a professional activity, with emphasis on development problems and solutions.  (RD CORE)

GEOG  373 - Political Geography
Explores links between global economic and political processes, national affairs and local politics. Designed to foster participation; assessment is via essays and assignments.

GEOG  379 - Urban Growth and Development
Location patterns in urban areas and processes of growth; historical development of U.S. cities, rent theory, housing markets, commercial and industrial location, the role of transportation, urban finance, New Urbanist planning and sustainable development concepts.  (RD CORE)

GEOG  416C - Urban Geographic Information Systems
Introduces concepts and application skills for use of geographic information systems to investigate a range of urban spatial issues and decision-making processes.  Emphasis on complete process of GIS-based problem solving, including project planning, spatial data sources/acquisition, preparation/coding, analysis, representation, and communication.  

GEOG  416F - GIS for the Social Sciences
An advanced course for students who want to integrate social science data and geographic information science into their research or work life.  The course is presented in a lecture/laboratory format.  The lecture portion will deal with conceptual issues necessary for the integration of social science data and approaches within a GIS framework.  The laboratory portion will provide practical experience with GIS software products used for the development and analysis of spatially-referenced social science data sets.

GEOG  417 - Geographic Information Systems for Natural and Social Sciences Introduction to the application of GIS and related technologies for both the natural and social sciences. Conceptual issues in GIS database design and development, analysis, and display.

GEOG  420 - Advanced Geographic Information Systems
Examines various areas of advanced GIS applications such as dynamic segmentation, surface modeling, spatial statistics, and network modeling. The use of high performance workstations will be emphasized.

GEOG  424 - Integrated Geographic Information Systems
Addresses the theoretical rationale, current knowledge and methods for achieving a common spatial basis between remote sensing (image) and GIS (non-image) data.
   
GEOG  430 - The Climate System
Systematic examination of processes and circulations comprising Earth's climate. Emphasis on circulations influencing geographic processes using examples of atmospheric environmental issues.

GEOG  446 - Health and the Global Economy
This course deals with the interconnection of the global economy, local social structures, and health, as well as examining disease and spatial aspects of health care, including access to care.

GEOG 455 – Gender and Resource Management in Latin America and Asia

GEOG  458 - Geography of Transportation
The course presents an overview of the geography of transportation and the relation between transportation and spatial organization. Approaches of description and normative analysis are integrated for understanding the geography of transport.

GEOG  461 - Environmental and Resource Geography
Examines physical resources (e.g. distribution, quantities, and availability) and the human factors which may contribute to their completion and deterioration as well as protection and maintenance

GEOG  462 - Environment and Development
This course evaluates theories and practices aimed at addressing the complex relationship between economic development and environmental protection in both industrialized and developing world contexts

GEOG  468 - Water and Sustainability
Social and environmental conflicts over water are intensifying in much of the world. This course studies the physical basis, history, and political economy of water development and water policy in the U.S. and internationally.

GEOG  483 - Geographic Applications of Remote Sensing
Use of aircraft and satellite imagery for monitoring landforms, soils, vegetation and land use, with the focus on problems of land-use planning, resource management and related topics.

GEOG  497F - Community and School Garden Workshop

This workshop-based course is designed to enable UA undergraduates and graduates students to work in Tucson-area schools helping students and teachers to undertake the design, construction, planting, harvesting and preparation of foods from a local school garden.  The workshop also involves preparing or assembling curriculum materials to enable teachers and students to teach and learn about food production, food histories and geographies, and food politics.  The course includes an intensive workshop sponsored by the Tucson Community Food Bank.  In addition to attending that workshop, students are also expected to attend at least one fieldtrip among the two that are organized during the semester as well as attend monthly meetings of the group on the UA campus. Most of the workshop, however, revolves around consistent and engaged involvement with a Tucson school and its teachers and students supporting the development and maintenance of school garden and attendant curriculum.

OTHER COURSES

GEOG  395A - Current Topics in Geography

Exchange of scholarly information and/or primary research through the Department's regularly scheduled Colloquium Series. Student responsibilities include critical reviews of presentations by local and visiting faculty. This course gives students a broad survey of the latest research within the subdisciplines in Geography.  One Credit – Meets Fridays 3:30-4:45pm, most weeks.

Preceptorships, Independent Studies, and Internships (one to six credits)

See also cross-listed courses that are housed in other departments.

To be scheduled:

Geography of Sports

An honors course with the topic “US-Mexico Border: Politics, Environment, and Society”